Now available: At long last I’m happy to announce the official release of my latest book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War. Support your local  local bookstore and tell your friends!

Merci.

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As you may have notice, these entries have been falling off in the last several weeks. My apologies. A new full-time job — very different from what I had been doing as the sports and features editor of a weekly community newspaper in suburban New jersey — has put new and strange demands on my time. More about that at another time perhaps.

In the meantime…

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  2. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  3. Teammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  4. Papi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  5. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  6. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  7. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  8. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  9. Catapult Loading System: How To Teach 100-Pound Hitters To Consistently Drive The Ball 300-Feet, by Joey Myers
  10. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman

*New on this list.

Hot New Releases

  1. The Pride of the Yankees: Lou Gehrig, Gary Cooper, and the Making of a Classic, by Richard Sandomir
  2. The Cooperstown Casebook: Who’s in the Baseball Hall of Fame, Who Should Be In, and Who Should Pack Their Plaques, by Jay Jaffe
  3. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team

Most Wished For

  1. Smart Baseball
  2. The Cubs Way
  3. Teammate

NY Times: Papi is number one on the June monthly sports best-selling list with Teammate #4; Ballplayer, #7;and Cubs Way, #8.

Just finished reading the new book on the making of one of my favorite movies. I hope to have its author on for a Bookshelf Conversation soon and will post a review. Some people might not like to see “how the sausage is made,” as the saying goes, but for me, it was a fascinating behind-the-scenes look. It just missed making the top ten here by a few sports.

Every once in awhile there’s a new “controversial” project that seeks to deconstruct the Hall of Fame process. When I received my review copy, I opened it at random and the first thing I saw was the section about Hank Greenberg. How’s that for coincidence?

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,297,901; last time: 1,148,852. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 127,622, up from the last time I looked when it was 276,653.

If you have read either of those books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing an Amazon review; it’s never too late. (And thanks to those who have.) Doesn’t have to be long or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it. Although I would warn you to understand what it is you’re reading. My editor tells me I shouldn’t worry over bad reviews and normally I don’t. But one Greenberg reviewer complained because apparently he felt it wasn’t long enough and that it wasn’t a full biography. Sorry, but caveat emptor: The title clearly states this book covers just one season in his career. If you’re disappointed for that reason, then that’s on you.

 

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An early start today because work.

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Image result for chicago white sox, shapiroTeammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  2. Papi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  3. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  4. Say It’s So: Papa, Dad, Me, and 2005 White Sox Championship Season, by Ben Shapiro *
  5. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  6. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  7. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  8. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  9. 2 Faith: The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story, by Ed Henry
  10. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood

*New on this list.

Hot New Releases

  1. Teammate
  2. Say It’s So
  3. Off Speed: Baseball, Pitching, and The Art of Deception

Most Wished For

  1. Teammate
  2. Papi
  3. Smart Baseball

NY Times: Papi drops off the list; no baseball titles this week. It is #1 on the June monthly sports best-selling list with Teammate #4; Ballplayer, #7;and Cubs Way, #8.

There’s no change in the top three from last week’s entry. Say It’s So is a self-published title and I imagine (although I could easily be wrong) that one relatively large order, perhaps by the author to sell at book appearances, could account for the high ranking.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,148,852; last week: 490,610. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 276,653, down from 77,629 last week.

If you have read either of those books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing an Amazon review; it’s never too late. (And thanks to those who have.) Doesn’t have to be long or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it. Although I would warn you to understand what it is you’re reading. My editor tells me I shouldn’t worry over bad reviews and normally I don’t. But one Greenberg reviewer complained because apparently he felt it wasn’t long enough and that it wasn’t a full biography. Sorry, but caveat emptor: The title clearly states this book covers just one season in his career. If you’re disappointed for that reason, then that’s on you.

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https://d3525k1ryd2155.cloudfront.net/h/844/334/753334844.0.m.jpgThe author of the inspirational memoir Fear Strikes Out — which openly chronicled Piersall’s battle with mental illness — died Saturday at the age of 87.

The book was much better than the movie. According to the excellent obituary by Richard Goldstein in The New York Times,

“I hated the movie,” Piersall wrote in his 1985 memoir. [Anthony] Perkins, he said, gave a fine performance but looked foolish trying to play baseball. He maintained that the movie included events that had never happened, and that he had never blamed his father for his breakdown.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41DBSFGTEGL._BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThat memoir — The Truth Hurts — was typical Piersall: unabashed, flamboyant, perhaps a bit harsh.

It’s a toss-up between Perkins and William Bendix, who played the title tole in the 1946 biopic, The Babe Ruth Story. Legend has it that Ruth hated that portrayal as well.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Image result for david ross teammateTeammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  2. Papi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  3. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  4. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  5. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  6. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  7. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  8. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  9. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller
  10. 42 Faith: The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story, by Ed Henry

*New on this list.

Hot New Releases

  1. Teammate
  2. Papi
  3. The Only Rule is It has to Work

Most Wished For

  1. Teammate
  2. Papi
  3. Smart Baseball

NY Times: Papi  drops to Number 11 after debuting at Number 5 last week. On the May monthly sports best-selling list: Cubs Way, #1; Ballplayer, #3; The Phenomenon, #8; 42 Faith, #10

I finally get why David Ross’ Teammate is so popular: He was a contestant on Dancing with the Stars, a show I must admit I never watch. Brilliant strategy. I wonder which came first: him writing a book or agreeing to be on the show?He seems to have acquitted himself well, too, making it all the way to the semi-finals.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 490,610; last week: 1,252,370. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 77,629, up from last week’s 152,060.

If you have read either of those books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing an Amazon review; it’s never too late. (And thanks to those who have.) Doesn’t have to be long or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it. Although I would warn you to understand what it is you’re reading. My editor tells me I shouldn’t worry over bad reviews and normally I don’t. But one Greenberg reviewer complained because apparently he felt it wasn’t long enough and that it wasn’t a full biography. Sorry, but caveat emptor: The title clearly states this book covers just one season in his career. If you’re disappointed for that reason, then that’s on you.

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Now it’s getting serious. Now we’re getting the the men who were playing when I was growing up. Sad.

Jim Bunning, a Hall of Fame pitcher who became a U.S. Senator, died yesterday at the age of 85. Here’s the New York Times‘ obituary by Richard Goldstein.

Bunning pitched a perfect game against the New York Mets on Fathers day in 1964, fitting since he had so many kids. He “authored” one book shortly after that and was the subject of a biography published in 1998, two years after the was inducted into the Hall.

He was the subject of numerous trivia questions, including one of 10 pitchers — and the first in the “modern era” — to win 100 games in both leagues.

 

THE STORY OF JIM BUNNING 1st HC/dj 1965 Ralph Berstein Philadelphia Phillies!!! Image result for jim bunning book

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Teammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeagerhttps://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51NwsE3gbSL._AC_US218_.jpg
  2. Papi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  3. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  4. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  5. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  6. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  7. Lou: Fifty Years of Kicking Dirt, Playing Hard, and Winning Big in the Sweet Spot of Baseball, by Lou Pinella and Bill Madden * (Look for my review on Bookreporter.com.)
  8. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Mike Methany with Jerry B. Jenkins
  9. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  10. The Plan: Epstein, Maddon, and the Audacious Blueprint for a Cubs Dynasty, by David Kaplan

*New on this list.

Hot New Releases

  1. Teammate
  2. Papi
  3. Teammate (Kindle)

Most Wished For

  1. Papi
  2. Smart Baseball
  3. Teammate

NY Times: Papi  is number five on the weekly list. On the May monthly sports best-selling list: Cubs Way, #1; Ballplayer, #3; The Phenomenon, #8; 42 Faith, #10

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,252,370; last week: 1,164,124. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 152,060, up from last week’s 266,449.

If you have read either of those books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing an Amazon review; it’s never too late. (And thanks to those who have.) Doesn’t have to be long or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it. Although I would warn you to understand what it is you’re reading. My editor tells me I shouldn’t worry over bad reviews and normally I don’t. But one Greenberg reviewer complained because apparently he felt it wasn’t long enough and that it wasn’t a full biography. Sorry, but caveat emptor: The title clearly states this book covers just one season in his career. If you’re disappointed for that reason, then that’s on you.

Save

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Image result for smart baseball, lawPapi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  2. Teammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  3. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  4. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  5. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  6. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  7. The Plan: Epstein, Maddon, and the Audacious Blueprint for a Cubs Dynasty, by David Kaplan
  8. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  9. Dinner with DiMaggio: Memories of An American Hero, by Dr. Rock Positano
  10. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis

Hot New Releases

  1. Papi
  2. Teammate
  3. mart Baseball

Most Wished For

  1. Smart Baseball
  2. Papi
  3. Teammate

NY Times May monthly sports best-selling list: Cubs Way, #1; Ballplayer, #3; The Phenomenon, #8; 42 Faith, #10

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,164,124; last week: 1,051,369. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 266,449, up from last week at 332,814.

If you have read either of those books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing an Amazon review; it’s never too late. (And thanks to those who have.) Doesn’t have to be long or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it. Although I would warn you to understand what it is you’re reading. My editor tells me I shouldn’t worry over bad reviews and normally I don’t. But one Greenberg reviewer complained because apparently he felt it wasn’t long enough and that it wasn’t a full biography. Sorry, but caveat emptor: The title clearly states this book covers just one season in his career. If you’re disappointed for that reason, then that’s on you.

 

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Image result for papi my storyTeammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  2. Papi: My Story, by David Ortiz with Michael Holley
  3. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci
  4. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  5. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law
  6. 42 Faith: The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story, by Ed Henry
  7. The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life, by Rick Ankiel with Tim Brown
  8. The Plan: Epstein, Maddon, and the Audacious Blueprint for a Cubs Dynasty, by David Kaplan
  9. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Mike Methany with Jerry B. Jenkins
  10. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Teammate
  2. Papi
  3. Smart Baseball

Most Wished For

  1. Teammate
  2. Smart Baseball
  3. Cubs Way

NY Times monthly sports best-seller list: Four baseball titles in the May monthly list:  Cubs Way (#1), Ballplayer (3), Phenomenon (8), and 42 Faith (10).

Not only is Ross’ book #1 among baseball titles, it’s #79 for all books, which I find amazing. But bye-bye, Moneyball, again.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,051,369; last week: 1,068,318. Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which launched April 25, currently ranks 332,814, down from last week at 156,525. But it just keeps bouncing up and down. In an hour it could be 94,000.

If you have read either of my books, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon pages; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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One of my favorite places on the planet hosts two more author events in the upcoming weeks.

First up at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse, tomorrow (May 10) at 7 p.m., Dr. Rock Positano will discuss his new release, Dinner with DiMaggio: Memories of an American Hero. From the book’s Amazon page:

The real Joe DiMaggio, remembered by one of the few who really knew the man behind the legend—candid and little-known stories about baseball icons from Ted Williams, Lou Gehrig, and his Yankees teammates on the field to Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, and others off the field. As told by Dr. Rock Positano, DiMaggio’s closest confidante in New York during the final years of his life, Dinner with DiMaggio is an intimate portrait of one of America’s most enduring heroes.

Next Wednesday, May 17, same time, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Ira Berkow chats about It Happens Every Spring: DiMaggio, Mays, the Splendid Splinter, and a Lifetime at the Ballpark. Again from Amazon:

Culled from 50 years’ worth of columns from one of the country’s most popular sportswriters, It Happens Every Spring stands as a remarkable and evocative anthology that is guaranteed to delight baseball fans of all ages. Former New York Times columnist Ira Berkow captures the spirit of America’s pasttime in this collection of opinions, stories, and observations from his long and distinguished career. From memories of Ted Williams and Satchel Paige to reflections on Jackie Robinson, Barry Bonds, and the soul of the beloved game, this work combines Berkow’s eye for detail with the comedy and drama revealed by the subjects themselves, bringing to life some of the most famous baseball personalities from the last half century.

Berkow was the driving force behind Hank Greenberg: The Story of My Life as well as the documentary Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story. He was also kind enough to do the foreword for my book on the Maccabiah Games.

Bonus points for you if you knew that It Happens Every Spring was also the name of a 1949 baseball feature starring Ray Milland. I don’t think it gets enough credit but I found it to be a charming little flick. See for yourself: you can watch the whole thing for free here, courtesy archive.org.

 

http://d28hgpri8am2if.cloudfront.net/book_images/onix/cvr9781501156847/dinner-with-dimaggio-9781501156847_hr.jpg   https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514FMU0iGML._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg   http://iv1.lisimg.com/image/120607/252full-it-happens-every-spring-poster.jpg

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They say the former Prime Minister and British icon read a book a day, even during the War. So I’m guessing, if he were still alive and had developed an interest in our national pastime, he would have enjoyed Tom Hoffarth’s 10th annual “30-for-30” baseball book feature. A pox on me for not keeping you informed on a more regular basis, but the links are still valid so have at it.

I’ve cut-and-pasted from the original post-event roundup. I’m sure Hoffarth won’t mind.

The complete 30-for-30 2017 list of baseball book reviews

Arranged by the quality of the work that we tried to pass along in each review:

SAVE IT TOP SHELF

== Day 28: “Fantasy Life: Baseball and the American Dream,” photographs by Tabitha Soren, text by Dave Eggers
== Day 27: “Off Speed: Baseball, Pitching and the Art of Deception,” by Terry McDermott
== Day 23: “Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones that are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball,” by Keith Law
== Day 20: “Leo Durocher: Baseball’s Prodigal Son,” by Paul Dickson
== Day 18: “The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips and the Pitch that Changed My Life,” by Rick Anikiel with Tim Brown
== Day 10: “The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse,” by Tom Verducci

ONES WE ARE QUITE FOND OF

== Day 30: “Baseball Is Back,” by Michael Turner
== Day 11: “Baseball Life Advice: Loving the Game That Saved Me,” by Stacey May Fowles
== Day 7: “One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime,” by John Florio and Ouisie Shapiro
== Day 2: “The Amazing Baseball Adventure: Ballpark Wonders from the Bushes to the Show,” by Josh Pahigian
== Day 3: “City of Dreams: Dodger Stadium and the Birth of Modern Los Angeles,” by Jerald Podair
== Day 1: “The Boy Who Knew Too Much: An Astounding True Story of a Young Boy’s Past-Life Memories,” by Cathy Byrd

LEARNING SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY

== Day 26: “The New Baseball Bible: Notes, Nuggets, Lists and Legends from Our National Pasttime,” by Dan Schlossberg (preface by Alan Schwarz, forward by Jay Johnstone)
== Day 25: “Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War,” by Ron Kaplan
== Day 24: “Lefty O’Doul: Baseball’s Forgotten Ambassador,” by Dennis Snelling
== Day 22: “Baseball Meat Market: The Stories Behind the Best and Worst Trades in History,” by Shawn Krest
== Day 17: “Lyman Bostock: The Inspiring Life and Tragic Death of a Ballplayer,” by K. Adam Powell
== Day 16: “Do You Want to Work in Baseball?: Advice to Acquire Employment in MLB and Mentorship in Scouting and Player Development,” by Bill Geivett
== Day 15: “Jackie Robinson: A Spiritual Biography: The Faith of a Boundary-Breaking Hero,” by Michael G. Long and Chris Lamb
== Day 13: “Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character,” by Marty Appel
== Day 12: “Seinsoth: The Rough and Tumble Life of a Dodger,” by Steven K. Wagner
== Day 9: “Lost Ballparks,” by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos
== Day 8: “Frick*: Baseball’s Third Commissioner,” by John P. Carvalho
== Day 6: “Making My Pitch: A Woman’s Baseball Odyssey,” by Ila Borders, with Jean Hastings Ardell

THANKS FOR PLAYING

== Day 29: “Cincinnati Red and Dodger Blue: Baseball’s Greatest Forgotten Rivalry” by Tom Van Riper
== Day 21: “Piazza: Catcher, Slugger, Icon, Star,” by Greg W. Prince
== Day 19: “Ballplayer,” by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
== Day 14: “The 50 Greatest Players in Dodgers History,” by Robert W. Cohen
== Day 5: “Baseball Beyond Our Borders: An International Pastime,” edited by George Gmelch and Daniel Nathan
== Day 4: “Dynastic, Bombastic, Fantastic: Reggie, Rollie, Catfish and Charlie Finley’s Swingin’ A’s,” by Jason Turbow

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Braggin’ on Bergino

May 5, 2017

Well, perhaps not bragging. That ain’t my style. But I did have a grand old time in my return visit to the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse, Jay Goldberg, proprietor, to discuss the new book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War.

Goldberg is a real friend to the author. He holds these “salons” frequently and the audience that shows up is always welcoming, knowledgeable, and inquisitive (if sometimes challenging in the question-and-answer portion of the program).

Happy to say it was standing room only with new friends and old ones such as Perry Barber, a professional umpire and former Jeopardy champion, and Lee Lowenfish, educator and author of several baseball books including the award-winning Branch Rickey: Baseball’s Ferocious Gentleman.

Not only did we sell out of books, but I came away with some lovely parting gifts. I feel like I want to write another baseball book just so I can go back to Bergino.

You can get an idea of the festivities from this video, which for the sake of brevity (and bandwidth) edits out a lot of the great Q&A:

 

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