Here’s my podcast listening schedule:

Wednesday and Thursday are used for whatever other programs are around that I pay attention to depending on the topi (Fresh Air, The Leonard Lopate Show, The Sporkful, The Gist, etc.)

One episode of the three “standards” will basically get me to or from work. And whenever they feature a baseball topic (much less likely on PCHH), I am especially tickled.

How how great is it that the past two episodes of EHG have featured baseball? In episode 46, Sarah Bunting and Joe Reid did a “fantasy draft” of FOX’s baseball announcers during the playoffs (Ron Darling was, indeed the darling of the group; Joe Buck, not so much). Bunting has major baseball chops.

On the current show, the led topic is the continuing downfall of The Survivor. Now I almost never watch reality TV, even when the “roster” includes a baseball personality, but I still take notice.In this case, it was John Rocker, who was recently voted off the island. Evidently he’s still a big a d**k as he was when he was playing. (Warning: If you’re going to listen to the shows, be aware that some of the language is NSFW.) I would respectfully disagree with the assessment of the EHG crew as to Rocker’s talents; Like him or not, for a while, he was a pretty solid reliever for the Braves.

https://usatftw.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/john-rocker.jpg?w=1000

Nice to know there are some things in this world you can still count on.

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Keeping inundated with all the breaking news in baseball can be hard going sometimes, especially if you source information from multiple websites. That’s why for efficiency purposes many fans are now relying on custom-built apps to get their daily fix of baseball gossip, results, or just simply general news.

Sifting through a multitude of downloadable baseball apps however is no fun for even the most devoted of fans and is extremely time consuming. That’s why in this post we thought we’d mix it up a little bit from the regular posts regarding books and look at how the world of publishing is evolving through the advent of apps that are ported straight to your mobile devices.

With the publishing industry evolving so rapidly and now relying on digital services to gain revenues instead of hardcover sales, most saw digital eBooks as the first new trend to eclipse the physical product. For a time eBooks were outselling their physical counterpart, with Amazon reputedly selling 306 digital items per second during the spike in sales.

However, as powerful as the publishing trade will always be it has been somewhat blown out the water by the efficiency in which apps bring content to the consumer. Ported directly to mobile platforms, apps have revolutionized the way we receive content. Gaming Realms, the company behind online portal Spin Genie stated that the “mobile Internet is one of the most powerful trends on the Internet landscape.” Just referencing the amount of downloads so far in such a short window is testament to the power of apps. In 2013 alone, Apple made $10 billion from app sales alone.

The potency of apps has never been more powerful and as generations grow up with them readily available, they will become even more prevalent in modern day society. However, for now, and certainly in this post, we will concentrate on the baseball apps we think you should have at the ready to keep abreast of all the breaking news.

theScore

theScore is a free app that enables you to customize your own news feed for your favorite team. Set up push notifications to alert you of breaking news and keep track of the starting lineups and latest results.

ESPN Sports Center

This list wouldn’t be complete without ESPN Sports Center. Why? Mainly due to its comprehensive coverage of all the four major sports in America, and if a story is going to break first, it’s usually via ESPN. The app also has some useful social integration features.

CBS Sports Fantasy Baseball

Fantasy baseball has blown up over the last five years with millions of Americans playing it annually. There was even an event in Las Vegas this year at the Cosmopolitan that has a prize pool of $3 million. The prize pool isn’t quite that extravagant, however you will be able to play in leagues against your friends, check live scores, accept trades, and all the usual fantasy related activities. It’s free to download and has a very easily navigable interface.

MLB.com at Bat

Another free app, MLB’s official app helps the user buy tickets, read the latest MLB news, follow their favorite teams and customize their settings. For premium subscribers, it has a host of other audio and visual features on offer such as live streams and exclusive interviews with the players.

http://www.gsmnation.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/MLB.com-At-Bat-Best-Sports-Apps.jpg

 

* This article was contributed by Thomas Jenkins. Thomas, a self-confessed sports fanatic and a follower of mobile apps. He spends his free time browsing sport-related apps and sharing them with his buddies.

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Update: A new title has been added to the mix and new prices are in effect. The changes have been reflected below.

I don’t know about you, but I’m finding this year’s World Series match-up is less than a major rush. The folks at MLB and the rest of the media have their work cut out for them trying to make this anything but a ratings flop. Count on strained connections between Kansas City and San Francisco that just aren’t as sexy as had, say, New York or Boston been involved.

That said, a new literary promotion kicks off in honor of the Fall Classic, with nine Kindle baseball books offered for just 99 cents each (actually, two cost $1.99) for the next seven days.

It’s a nice mish-mash of topics. The titles include a former Casey Award winner, an early Pat Jordan release, and a seminal account of early Negro League baseball from Sol White.

Here’s the lineup:

  • http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Mf0a4cuyL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThe Book of Baseball Literacy, 3rd Ed., by David Martinez
  • The Greatest Show on Dirt, by James Bailey
  • High and Inside, by Russell Rowland
  • Nine Bucks a Pound, by James Bailey
  • The Ringer, by Jenny Shank ($1.99)
  • The Rules Abide, by Jim Tosches
  • Slouching Toward Fargo, by Neal Karlen (1999 Casey winner, $1.99)
  • Sol White’s Official Base Ball Guide ($1.99)
  • The Suitors of Spring, by Pat Jordan
  • Parker Field, by Howard Owen ($1.99)

You can find summaries of the books here.

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Last Friday marked the 25th anniversary of the World Series earthquake in San Fransisco which occurred just minutes before Game One of the face-off between the host Giants and cross-bay Rival Oakland As. And we have not one, but two documentaries to commemorate the occasion.

One, The Day The Series Stopped, was produced under ESPN’s 30 for 30 banner. It features the standard interview/news clip mix but with the resources a giant corporation like ESPN can throw behind it in terms of editing and post-production amenities.

The other bears a similar title — The Day the World Series Stopped but is a basically one man’s tale of shock and awe.

Buy the DVD now!Jon Leonoudakis was at that game with his brother, Tim. It was the first time his beloved “Jints” had made it to the World Series since 1962, which they lost to the New York Yankees on the final at-bat of Game Seven. The earthquake and its aftermath are seen through their eyes and those of their friends, other family members, and fellow fans. It’s at once a terribly sad and triumphant look at the disaster. Much more than the ESPN production, this as a home-movies vibe, which may or may not be your cup of tea. But the Leonoudakis clan takes great joy and comfort in their relationships and that comes across so much, as opposed to “just another project” for the ESPN crew.

Leonoudakis, who served as producer/writer/director/editor for this one, didn’t see much of a conflict with the two films. “Their show is a macro perspective of the vent, whereas mine is more micro,” he told me in a text message. “They should complement each other well.”

Prior to his World Series project, Jon Leonoudakis had similar “hyphenate” for Not Exactly Cooperstown, a documentary about the Baseball Reliquary, a fun and somewhat quirky book about an eclectic group of fans on the West Coast who celebrate off-beat and entertaining aspects and personalities of the game. I spoke with Leonoudakis back then; here’s that Bookshelf Conversation.

 

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

Here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1320517865l/9359172.jpgMoneyball, by Michael Lewis
  2. Derek Jeter #2: Thanks for the Memories, by David Fischer
  3. The Extra 2 %, by Jonah Keri
  4. The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter, by Ian O’Connor (Bookreporter.com review)
  5. The Mental Game of Baseball, by H.A. Dorfman
  6. Rickey & Robinson, by Roger Kahn (Bookreporter.com review)
  7. The Life You Imagine: Life Lessons for Achieving Your Dreams, by Derek Jeter
  8. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told, by Jeff Silverman
  9. The Bill James Handbook 2015
  10. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)

Now that the novelty has worn off and we’re well into the post season, the number of books in the top 10 about #2 has halved, from six to three. I wonder if the news that the Los Angeles Dodgers have hired Andrew Friedman away from the Tampa Bay rays is the reason for the renewed interest in the Keri book.

One of there things that has improved, publishing-wise, over the past several years is the ability to bring a title like The Bill James Handbook to market almost as soon as the regular season ends. When you think about it, the statistics are kept on an ongoing basis, replete with all the “splits,” so it’s not as difficult as it used to be, especially when all there is is the numbers. Unlike Hard Times’ and Baseball Prospectus’ annuals, the BJHB has little in the way of commentary, which still takes some time to produce. You have to decide how important it is to have such a publication available so quickly.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right? Only five (!) copies left on Amazon.

And if you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

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“God and country…”

October 15, 2014 · 0 comments

Although for me, it seems to be “Baseball and Food.”

Next to baseball, I like to spend my copious spare time noodling around the kitchen. The Food Network comes in a close second to the MLB Network, et al, when it comes to appointment TV. And after the national pastime, my favorite reading material — books, magazines, ingredients on cereal packages — focuses on food.

I chanced upon Dan Pashman on a Leonard Lopate Show and was immediately taken by this fun and educational way to think about eating. In fact, the motto for Pashman’s podcast, The Sporkful, is “It’s not for foodies, it’s for eaters.”

http://payload319.cargocollective.com/1/6/210354/8693251/ss_emb_post01.jpgHe just released his first book, Eat More Better: How to Make Every Bite More Delicious and it’s just as entertaining as the show. In fact, just last night I employed his method for reheating pizza, a surprising simple process that takes much less time than an oven and much more even than a microwave.

To further enhance my opinion of Pashman — who grew up as a Yankee fan but became a Cubs masochist after living in Chicago for a few years — he dedicated a show back in June to ballpark food: “Eat Me Some Peanuts and Cracker Jack.” Guests included

  • Nile Brisson, a third generation peanut man and president of Peanut Processors, Inc. in North Carolina to talk about all things goober.
  • Mike Pesca, a regular on Slate’s Hang Up and Listen podcast, who looks at the history of the song “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” in an On The Media piece, and tries to put a dollar value on the free advertising that the song has given to Cracker Jack over the decades.
  • Ted Berg, USA Today sports writer and a former food vendor at Shea Stadium, on why pre-wrapping hot dogs instead of putting them in the buns in the seats improves sales. He also shares the story of some hot dog-related friction with a Yankee fan. (Guess he had a “beef” with him. Eh? Eh? Unless they’re pork hot dogs, in which case never mind).

If you love food as much as baseball, and happen to be in the neighborhood, Pashman will be making several appearances in the New York area over the next couple of weeks including

  • Thursday, Oct. 16  WORD Bookstore, Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 18 Time NY Wine and Food Festival (WNYC’s booth at the Grand Tasting at Pier 94)
  • Sunday, Oct. 19, Watchung Booksellers, Montclair, NJ, 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 22 BookCourt, Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, 7 p.m. (with a Mac and cheese tasting courtesy of Jack the Horse Tavern and special presentation on wings from Sporkful Junior Eaters Society President Nathaniel Goodyear)

http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1969157.1412887085!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/article_970/eatscov12f-7-web.jpg

 

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I don’t get to New York City much these days and when I do, it’s usually to attend an event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/20/Mort_Gerbergheadshot.jpg/230px-Mort_Gerbergheadshot.jpgWish I could get to this one, though. I did a story about Gerberg several years ago when one of his collections came out. Unfortunately, it’s not on the newspaper’s website, so I can’t link to it. Suffice it to say, Gerberg is a hoot. He was the “cartoon editor” for one of my favorites, Joy In Mudville: The Big Book of Baseball Humor

Gerberg will be the featured guest at the Clubhouse’s Fall Art Party on Thursday, Oct. 23, from 6-9 p.m. RSVP to 212-226-7150.

From the event announcement:

Mort Gerberg is a longtime cartoonist and author best known for his work in The New Yorker, Playboy and numerous other publications.

A founding member and president of The Cartoonists Guild, he has written, edited and/or illustrated 43 books for adults and children. For other fun, Mort plays the piano, second base, tennis, ping pong, skis, dances, and sings in a choir.

Mort Gerberg’s cartoons — prized originals and prints — will be on exhibit and available for purchase.

Complimentary beer, beverages, ballpark snacks, and laughs.

http://imgc-cn.artprintimages.com/images/P-473-488-90/60/6069/4WYD100Z/posters/mort-gerberg-man-pushes-giant-baseball-up-hill-toward-batter-who-stands-ready-at-top-new-yorker-cartoon.jpg

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Back (for the moment)

October 14, 2014 · 0 comments

“Been away so long I hardly knew the place,…”

Haven’t forgotten my peeps. Just been crazy busy with my new book.

Kind of interesting, having had the experience with 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die with it’s bipolarness — highs when the book was doing well and the interviews were frequent, and lows in terms of zero royalties (which does not mean the book has stopped selling), and decreasing interest/feedback from the publisher as they move on to new projects — I wonder what will this project will bring.

It’s a different publisher with a different philosophy, but the subject matter — the Maccabiah Games, aka “The Jewish Olympics” — has a niche audience. Just the thing for bar/bat mitzvah and Chanukah presents! Perhaps there will be even more opportunities for author events around the U.S. and even around the world, since the Maccabiah Games is an international event. (After all we are the people of the book.)

It’s certainly been a challenge. I’ve been quite surprised/disappointed in the lack of “official” record-keeping. One of the interesting aspects of the Games is that the sporting events change so frequently, depending on  if there are enough participating athletes. Sometimes there are, sometimes not. So in one “Maccabiyad” you might have Team Handball, but not in the next, then have it again in the one after that.

Another curious encounter is the lack of what I would consider cogent and organized record-keeping. There’s a lot of raw data in the form of spreadsheets, which I’ve been trying to decipher, but if there’s an “official” list of winners, I have yet to encounter it. It’s almost as thought the organizers don’t think it’s all that important.

While the creative process is fun — you “meet” all kinds of interesting people in the interview process –  I’m looking forward to handing in the manuscript, tinkering with the editing, and leaning back with a tall frosty beverage.

Of course, all this means I haven’t read a baseball book in a long time. There are some interesting things coming down the pike. I’ll be writing about them soon.

Wish me luck.

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I know,I know. I have been remiss. Haven’t posted in a while. Just been so busy with the new (non-baseball) book. But I hope to find a few minutes here and there to keep you coming back.

So here’s an announcement: the Temple Emanu-El Skirball Center, located at One East 65th Street in Manhattan, will host a free panel discussion on our favorite topic on Sunday, Oct. 26, at 10:30 am. (So there’s plenty of time to get home for the World Series).

The panelists include:

  • Alan Dershowitz – Longtime Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law at Harvard Law School (ret.), prolific author, defender of American civil rights, Israel and the accused… and a baseball fan.
  • Ira Berkow – Pulitzer Prize-winning sports reporter and columnist of The New York Times, and best-selling author. His books include a memoir with Hank Greenberg, collaborations with Walt Frazier and Rod Carew, and the recent series, Summers at Shea, Summers in the Bronx, and Autumns in the Garden.
  • Donald Fehr – Executive Director of the National Hockey League Players Association and former Executive Director of the Major League Players Association, 1985–2009.

http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/jewishaz.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/d3/bd3b5efc-4be4-11e3-ac63-001a4bcf6878/5282a389e0c2e.image.jpgThe program will be moderated by Larry Ruttman, author of American Jews & America’s Game, which was chosen as the best baseball book of 2014 by Sports Collector’s Digest.

Reservations are requested for planning purposes. For more information call 212-507-9580 or visit the Skirball Center’s website.

In the meantime, you can get a sample of Ruttman here:

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When I make my regular Amazon searches, I get annoyed at having to wade through a lot of superfluous material. If they can put a man on the moon, why can’t they have a mechanism that will allow me to filter out books targeted towards juvenile readers? That would significantly reduce the time I have to waste looking for pertinent material.

Of course, some would say that’s exactly why you can’t filter; Amazon wants you on the site as long as possible.

A while back I was looking up what new baseball titles are coming down the pike (378 on Derek Jeter) I found an awful lot of what in some circles could be classified as “romance novels” while some others are probably just plain erotica (you say po-tay-to, I say po-tah-to.)

Herewith a small sampling. Mind you, I’m not looking for books like this; this is what organically pops up during routine searches. I have no idea as to their literary value nor am I even curious. (And just a blanket statement: I haven’t attached the links so you can’t “look inside.”)

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Because you can put a stopwatch on your bookshelf.

The regular season was over but the post-season hadn’t started yet. What to do? I know! Let’s talk about how to speed up the games. That’s appropriate right before you air even longer games, thanks to team introductions (including the trainers) and more elaborate “honoring America” presentations. (Just imagine how much longer they’d be if the Toronto Blue Jays had made it; they’d have to play the Canadian national anthem, too.)

ESPN’s Outside the Lines took up this crucial topic on a recent program. Among the panelists: former player Doug Glanville, analyst Tim Kurkjian, columnist Terrence Moore, and Rick White, president of the independent Atlantic League.

Among the suggestions, many of which were common sense: enforce the rule in the book that requires the pitcher to deliver the ball within the proscribed time limit; limit the number of times the defense can call time (catcher/pitcher confabs), and make batters stay in the box. One of the more outlandish ones was sending the runner to first base on an intentional walk without having the pitcher deliver four pitches. Yeah that takes a lot of time. This is actually in place in the Atlantic League. There was even some mention about “making” the batters be more aggressive so they wouldn’t take so many pitches.

What wasn’t mentioned? The role television plays in all this. I love how (most) broadcasters omit this little item from their list of complaints. You know why games prior to the 1960s took such much less time? They didn’t have to wait for the commercials to be over.

And while we’re at it, here’s my suggestion. It seems most of the pitch selection comes from the dugout these days. How much time is wasted because the battery can’t get together on the signs? So instead of having the catcher look over to get the signs and then relay them to the pitcher, why couldn’t he wear an earpiece, like quarterbacks? Can’t you just see it? You could have a coach with a computer immediately updating scenarios based on count, runners on base, number of outs, crunching all the outcome probabilities and coming up with the “perfect” pitch. IT, get someone on that right away, will you?

(Ooh, ohh, even better. Eliminate the middle man and give the earpiece to the pitcher!)

 

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

Here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. Derek Jeter #2: Thanks for the Memories, by David Fischer (Pub. Date Oct. 14)
  2. The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter, by Ian O’Connor (Bookreporter.com review)
  3. The Life You Imagine: Life Lessons for Achieving Your Dreams, by Derek Jeter
  4. Derek Jeter: Excellence and Elegance, The New York Times (Pub. date Dec. 1)
  5. Derek Jeter: Born to be a Yankee, NY Post
  6. Rickey & Robinson, by Roger Kahn (Bookreporter.com review)
  7. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)
  8. Moneyball, by Michael Lewis
  9. Core Four: The Heart and Soul of the New York Yankees, by Phil Pepe
  10. The Mental Game of Baseball, by H.A. Dorfman

Quelle surprise: Six of the top 10 books have the recently-retired future Hall of Famer as a major, if not sole, topic (seven if you include Rivera’s memoir).  Fisher’s book is due out in a few days so I’m not sure if it will include his final games, but I am pretty certain the Times’ book will be as complete as possible, unlike the Posts‘ early release.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right? Only five (!) copies left on Amazon.

And if you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

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Derek Jeter’s next phase

"Ripped from today's headlines..."

I guess the just-retired future Hall of Famer wants to keep busy. Less than a week after appearing in his final game, Jeter announced the launch of The Players’ Tribune  a new website promising to give fans (subscribers?) “a place where pro athletes can “connect directly with our fans, with no filter.” This was a […]

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What becomes a legend most?

"Ripped from today's headlines..."

It’s a shame that Derek Jeter’s final days as a Yankee have to be enmeshed in this “debate” over his place in team and MLB history. When I first heard about Keith Olbermann’s “Jeter smackdown,” I thought, “there Keith  goes again, trying to show he’s the smartest guy in the room.” But after listening to […]

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Divine intervention?

"Ripped from today's headlines..."

(Because you can put all your Jeter memorabilia on a bookshelf.) Tomorrow is Derek Jeter’s final home game. Tomorrow is the first day of Rosh Hashana. Tomorrow, the weather forecast calls for rain. God is not a Yankees fan. Note: 100% chance of rain… So this begs the question: What will happen? Will the Yankees […]

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Review roundup: Rickey & Robinson

2014 title

Usually when I do these things, there are several titles for consideration. But in this case, there are enough to give Roger Kahn’s latest title its own entry, although very few to date have appeared in mainstream publications. I’m adding my thoughts on some of the reviews, but you will make your of judgments. Here’s […]

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Not on my bookshelf

"Oddballs"

My old friend Steven Rosch posted a link to an SI article about the next big thing in baseball equipment on my Facebook timeline. I know you have to move along with the times, but this, this is an abomination. I understand not all gloves are made of leather; you frequently read about poor  kids […]

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Baseball best-sellers, Sept. 19

2013 title

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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It’s a short, short time from April to September

Because I can...

What? The season is almost over? Where did the time go? Went to the Mets-Marlins game last night. Pretty depressing. The announced attendance was 23,892, or 57 percent of capacity. Seemed like whole sections were empty.  With just three home games left, against the Houston Astros over the last weekend of the season, doesn’t look […]

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Judging a book by its cover: The NaturalUpdate

Baseball art

Last month, I heard a  fascinating episode of The Leonard Lopate Show about what we “see” when we read. The guest was Peter Mendelsund, whose primary occupation is that of a book cover designer. You can listen to the segment here: August was a busy month for Mendelsund. Not only did he publish the aforementioned […]

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