NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  2. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  3. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times. Lindbergh was also the featured speaker at an author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. You can hear him on the store’s podcast here:
  4. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  5. http://isbn-books.factsfetch.com/FF3/9781613219133.jpgI’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  6. The Mental Game of Baseball: A Guide to Peak Performance, by H.A. Dorfman
  7. The Natural, by Bernard Malamud
  8. One Shot at Forever: A Small Town, an Unlikely Coach, and a Magical Baseball Season, by Chris Ballard
  9. The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers, by Michael Leahy. My interview with the author here and here and my review from Bookreporter here.)
  10. Fall from Grace: The Truth and Tragedy of “Shoeless Joe” Jackson, by Tim Hornbaker *

* Indicates debut on this list

All due respect but another biography about Shoeless Joe? Hornbaker is also the author of Turning the Black Sox White: The Misunderstood Legacy of Charles A. Comiskey and the immodestly titled War on the Basepaths: The Definitive Biography of Ty Cobb.

Several “old favorites” return to the list, including books by Dorfman and Malamud. But I’m shocked that Methany’s book tops the list (again, all due respect).

NY Times: Three baseball titles are included in the most recent Times‘ sports list: The Only Rule and Sacrifice Flies make the top 10 (four and six, respectively) with Bret Boone’s Home Games at #15. That one surprises me, all due respect to Mr. Boone and co-author Kevin Cook. While I find the story of the three generations of Boone players mildly interesting, it seems like a lightweight compared with something like Leahy’s Last Innocents. One man’s opinion.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 450,047; last week: 722,348.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1448215799l/26074154.jpgYou can read the introduction to Part One here. The sentiment remains the same.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  2. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times. Lindbergh was also the featured speaker at a recent author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. You can hear him on the store’s podcast here:
  3. I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  4. https://dump.bz/storage-2/0616/th_WLfhtP9ZqRZe8edkN5kRX3X6PbY5IbZE.jpgThe Big Hurt’s Guide to BBQ and Grilling: Recipes from My Backyard to Yours, by Frank Thomas *
  5. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  6. Game 7, 1986: Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life, by Ron Darling with Daniel Paisner
  7. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  8. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, by Charles Leerhsen (paperback edition)
  9. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman
  10. Jim Palmer: Nine Innings to Success: A Hall of Famer’s Approach to Achieving Excellence, by Jim Palmer with Alan Maimon. Palmer was also at Bergino, so you can here that program here:

* Indicates debut on the BBS list. Baseball and BBQ: a perfect pair.

NY Times: Three baseball titles are included in the most recent Times‘ sports list: The Only Rule and Sacrifice Flies make the top 10 (four and six, respectively) with Bret Boone’s Home Games at #15. That one surprises me, all due respect to Mr. Boone and co-author Kevin Cook. While I find the story of the three generations of Boone players mildly interesting, it seems like a lightweight compared with something like Leahy’s Last Innocents. One man’s opinion.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 722,348; last week: 384,321. Remember Dad on his special day!

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/722129703096623104/dV81Pha1.jpgIf you’re lucky, once in a while on your literary travels, you will come across a book that will be unlike anything you’ve read before. This is especially true if you concentrate on a specific genre or theme like mystery novels, biographies about your favorite personality or, oh, I don’t know, let’s just say baseball books. You’ve read so many of these things, and hopefully many of them are enjoyable, but to find something truly different is the pot of gold we hope to find after so much time spent.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51FLABT1EJL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgFor me, The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers is such a book. I believe my age demographic — those who came to baseball after the Dodgers left Brooklyn in the late 1950s — is the perfect audience. And Michael Leahy does a marvelous service to his subject, a handful of players on that team including Maury Wills, Sandy Koufax, Lou Johnson, Tommy Davis, Dick Tracewski, Jeff Torborg, and Wes Parker. Not all of them were superstars; Koufax was the only one of the group who was inducted into the Hall of Fame, but they were all a part of a special time in the history of America and the fact that they were merely athletes does not diminish their thoughts and contributions.

Leahy delves more deeply into the personae of a ballplayer, going into areas of self-doubt on both a personal and professional level survival, than any author I’ve come across. The drama goes beyond the game on the field into real-life consequences, but without the overwrought stylings other writers try to infuse in their projects to give it a sense of gravitas. Suffice it to say, this is one of the best, most thoughtful books about baseball and the people who participate in it you’re likely to find.

And that’s right, this is only part one. Unfortunately, broadband limitations have forced me into this unique situation. When I contact potential guests, I always say the conversation will take about 20 minutes or so, wanting to be considerate of their schedules. But I will never cut things off if they’re will go beyond. So tune in again next Monday for Part Two.

 

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  2. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times. Lindbergh was also the featured speaker at a recent author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. You can hear him on the store’s podcast here:
  3. I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. Jim Palmer: Nine Innings to Success: A Hall of Famer’s Approach to Achieving Excellence, by Jim Palmer with Alan Maimon. Palmer was also at Bergino, so you can here that program here:
  6. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, by Charles Leerhsen (paperback edition)
  7. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  8. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  9. If These Walls Could Talk: Milwaukee Brewers: Stories from the Milwaukee Brewers Dugout, Locker Room, and Press Box, by Bill Schroeder
  10. The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers, by Michael Leahy. (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com. And look for my Bookshelf Conversation with Leahy next week.)

NY Times: Once again, three baseball titles are included in the most recent Times‘ sports list: The Only Rule and Sacrifice Flies make the top 10 (four and six, respectively) with Bret Boone’s Home Games at #15. That one surprises me, all due respect to Mr. Boone and co-author Kevin Cook. While I find the story of the three generations of Boone players mildly interesting, it seems like a lightweight compared with something like Leahy’s Last Innocents. One man’s opinion.

In addition, the Times finally got around to a general sports roundup which includes two baseball titles: The Arm and, again, The Only Rule.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 384,321; last week: 987,870. Yay! Guess the Dads and Grads season is upon us.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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appears on Bookreporter.com. http://www.bookreporter.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/book_main/covers/0062360566.jpg

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Many of us play Strat-o-matic or some other fantasy version of the game. Robert Coover wrote the classic baseball fiction, The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IQLEE8AtL.jpghttps://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Dq5VQphmL._UX250_.jpgWell, Coover has company in Jeff Polman, who recently released Twinbill: Further Immersions in Historical Baseball Fiction — his fourth book — which includes a speculative piece about Hank Greenberg, the Hall of Famer first-baseman/outfielder in the years leading up to World War II.

I had somewhat of an ulterior motive for speaking with Polman since I’m working on my own book about Hammerin’ Hank. Here’s our conversation.

 

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Yesterday marked the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s death.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/40/82/43/408243d316c9553b69ca60a007751021.jpg

http://www.paulgallico.info/lougehrig_us.jpgI’m guessing that has something to do with the addition of Lou Gehrig: Pride of the Yankees by the legendary Paul Gallico to the Amazon baseball best-selling list (as a Kindle book).

Naturally more recent books on Gehrig have enjoyed the ability of temporal distance as well as the availability of additional research. Here are two of my favorites:

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times. Lindbergh was also the featured speaker at a recent author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. You can hear him on the store’s podcast here:
  2. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  3. I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  4. Jim Palmer: Nine Innings to Success: A Hall of Famer’s Approach to Achieving Excellence, by Jim Palmer with Alan Maimon *
  5. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  6. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  7. The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers, by Michael Leahy
  8. If These Walls Could Talk: Milwaukee Brewers: Stories from the Milwaukee Brewers Dugout, Locker Room, and Press Box, by Bill Schroeder
  9. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, by Charles Leerhsen (paperback edition)
  10. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood

What the…? Dueling covers?

http://www.booksigningcentral.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/15.1.jpg http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51r9OnHvGGL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

* Making debut on this list

I almost hesitate to include the Palmer book here. I have a thing against business/management/self-help books that use baseball as an marketing device. Otherwise, pretty static. Look for my review of Leahy’s book coming soon from Bookreporter.com, as well as a “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.

NY Times: Once again, three baseball titles are included in the most recent Times‘ sports list: The Only Rule and Sacrifice Flies make the top 10 (four and six, respectively) with Bret Boone’s Home Games at #15. That one surprises me, all due respect to Mr. Boone and co-author Kevin Cook. While I find the story of the three generations of Boone players mildly interesting, it seems like a lightweight compared with something like Leahy’s Last Innocents. One man’s opinion.

In addition, the Times finally got around to a general sports roundup which includes two baseball titles: The Arm and, again, The Only Rule.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 987,870; last week: 448,704. The honeymoon is over. I didn’t expect it to last.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times. Lindbergh was also the featured speaker at a recent author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. You can hear him on the store’s podcast here:
  2. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  3. I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  4. The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers, by Michael Leahy
  5. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  6. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  7. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  8. The Mental Game of Baseball: A Guide to Peak Performance, by H.A. Dorfman
  9. Game 7, 1986: Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life, by Ron Darling with Daniel Paisner (My review from Bookreporter.com)
  10. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, by Charles Leerhsen (paperback edition)

Pretty static. Noting new and little shifting in the order from last week. The New York Mets are commemorating their 1986 World Championship during their weekend series with the visiting Los Angeles Dodgers, so the return of Darling’s memoir is appropriate.

NY Times: As of last week, there have been no reviews for any of the new batch, which is kind of surprising. Usually these things happen around opening day to mark the beginning of the season., But then again, I’m still waiting for TCM to air The Pride of the Yankees.

Three baseball titles are included in the Times‘ sports list for May. Two aren’t much of a surprise: The Arm (No. 4) and Ron Darling’s Mets memoir (No. 7). The other, however, is pretty stunning: I Never Had It Made: An Autobiography of Jackie Robinson, as told to Alfred Duckett. I can only surmise the increased/renewed interest stems from the recent Ken Burn’s documentary on the iconic ballplayer/civil rights hero. The book, ninth on the Times‘ list, was released shortly after Robinson died in 1972. The Grind: Inside Baseball’s Endless Season, by Barry Svrluga, comes in at number 19.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 448,704; last week: 494,010. Even better. Two weeks in a row of sub-500K? I’ll take it.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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The actor Alan Young passed away at the age of 96 on Thursday.

Baseball connection?

Several of the Dodgers, including Sandy Koufax, John Roseboro, Willie Davis, and Moose Skowron appeared as themselves, as well as the voice of Vin Scully.

 

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51FLABT1EJL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThe Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team, by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller. (A review from The Hardball Times.)
  2. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  3. I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies: Inside the Game We All Love, by Tim Kurkjian (Here’s my review on Bookreporter.com and the “Bookshelf Conversation” with the author.)
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, by Charles Leerhsen (paperback)
  6. If These Walls Could Talk: Milwaukee Brewers: Stories from the Milwaukee Brewers Dugout, Locker Room, and Press Box, by Bill Schroeder
  7. The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers, by Michael Leahy *
  8. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  9. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  10. The Mental Game of Baseball: A Guide to Peak Performance, by H.A. Dorfman
  • Indicates debut on this list

The anecdote used to go that the three teams written about most were the New York Yankees, the Boston Red Sox, and the Chicago Cubs. Makes sense; they are among the oldest teams in the game. But add to the list the Dodgers, whether in the Brooklyn of Los Angeles incarnations. Fans of the Ebbetts Field crew are like the greatest generation in that they’re beginning to dwindle so books about the days of Jackie, Pee Wee and Oisk are similarly fading while the newer titles now consider the LA teams of the6 0s and 70s.

Three baseball titles are included in The New York Times‘ sports list for May. Two aren’t much of a surprise: The Arm (No. 4) and Ron Darling’s Mets memoir (No. 7). The other, however, is pretty stunning: I Never Had It Made: An Autobiography of Jackie Robinson, as told to Alfred Duckett. I can only surmise the increased/renewed interest stems from the recent Ken Burn’s documentary on the iconic ballplayer/civil rights hero. The book, ninth on the Times‘ list, was released shortly after Robinson died in 1972. The Grind: Inside Baseball’s Endless Season, by Barry Svrluga, comes in at number 19.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 494,010; last week: 1,111,362. Woo-hoo! Thanks! At this rate, 501 should be number one very shortly. FYI, I have queried University of Nebraska Press to see if there’s interest in a revised edition in the not too distant future, given that a number of excellent titles have been published in the intervening years.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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In Jeopardy of not knowing why this happens so often…

"Oddballs"

There has to be something going on on Jeopardy. How else to explain the high number of clues regarding baseball over the past several weeks. It seems like there is at least one reference per week. Sometimes an entire category is devoted to some aspect of the national pastime as in this from last night’s […]

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Here’s the Pitch Update

2016 title

Revised to include my oversight in omitting the Bad News Bears TV show. While baseball and TV go great together, episodic series about the national have never done well. None of the attempts have lasted more than one season. Ball Four. Based on Jim Bouton’s seminal book and starring the author as aversion of himself. […]

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The Bookshelf Conversation: Tim Kurkjian

2016 title

Tim Kurkjian was one of the first interviews I did for the Bookshelf in its current iteration. (I’m still surprised, after all these years all these years later, that someone on that level would bother with a relatively low level blog such as this, and that’s not humble bragging.) Over the years I’ve found Kurkjian […]

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The Bookshelf Review: I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies

2016 title

By Tim Kurkjian via Bookreporter.com.               Be sociable, share the Bookshelf! Tweet

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Baseball Best-Sellers, May 13, 2016

2015 title

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on […]

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Guest column: Parity & The End Of Baseball Dynasties

Guest Column

Editor’s note: It’s always great to be able to provide a guest column. This one comes from Thomas Danielson, a freelance writer who has loved baseball ever since he went to his first live game at Fenway Park. It’s especially timely given the previous entry on the Bookshelf.  * * * * * In 2004, […]

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Authors appearance: Dynasties past (and future?)

2015 title

Baseball has always had supreme rulers. The New York Yankees, with 27 world championships, are generally acknowledged as baseball’s most dynastic franchise, beginning with their rush to greatness in the early 1920s. Even teams more known for their ineptitude — the Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs — once dominated the national pastime. But are […]

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“One of the great moments in the history of baseball”

"Oddballs"

Funny, just the other day I received a copy of Dingers: The 101 Most Memorable Home Runs in Baseball History. I suggest the authors immediately revise the book to include this… Those of you who have been reading this blog or the Baseball Bookshelf know I hate hyperbole. The use of word’s like “greatest” or […]

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