Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

As you may have notice in recent weeks, the output on the Bookshelf has been sparse. Received a one-week extension on my new book, which means it will be that much longer until things return to “normal.”

So without further ado, here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

    1. http://img1.imagesbn.com/p/9780375424694_p0_v1_s260x420.JPGJeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter
    2. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman
    3. Glory Days in Tribe Town: The Cleveland Indians and Jacobs Field 1994-1997, by Terry Pluto and Tom Hamilton
    4. 2014 World Series Champions: San Francisco Giants, by Major League Baseball
    5. Triple Crowned: The San Francisco Giants’ Incredible 2014 Championship Season
    6. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
    7. Derek Jeter: Excellence and Elegance, by The New York Times
    8. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)
    9. The Baseball Codes: Beanballs, Sign Stealing, and Bench-Clearing Brawls: The Unwritten Rules of America’s Pastime, by Jason Turbow
    10. A Nice Little Place on the North Side: Wrigley Field at One Hundred, by George F. Will

Second week in a row that, for this writing at least, each of the top ten titles is an physical book. Usually I have to cull the e-books from the list to get to 10 physical hold-in-your-hands piece of work. Nice to see. Perhaps it’s the gift-giving thing; you can’t really wrap an e-book.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, although it is doing a bit better of late. Still, ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right?

If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

 

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Lest we forget: Sy Berger

December 15, 2014 · 0 comments

The baseball card scion died yesterday at the age of 91.

If you were a red-blooded American boy, you probably collected some form of “sports cards” as a kid. Most likely, they were the offspring of Berger, who created Topps back in the early 1950s.

Although trading cards have been around for more than 100 years, Berger turned into a major industry. Surprisingly, when they first came out, it was the cards that was the bonus when you purchased gum. Late it switched and boomers recall fondly those pink slabs that lasted forever, link Twinkies. I’m sure you can still buy unopened packs from those years and the gum is still “usable,” for lack of a better word. In my opinion, the end of childhood, regardless of your age, when they stopped including the gum in the packs.

The cliche goes that just about everyone’s mother threw out the cards at some point, thereby depriving the collectors and their progeny the thousands of dollars that the pieces of cardboard became in the 1980s and 90s, before the collectible market dropped. Me, I was my own worst enemy, gluing the cards to posters, writing on them when the players moved from one team to another.

Marty Appel, baseball PR guru, posted this to Facebook yesterday:

Sorry to announce the passing early this morning of Sy Berger, 91, in Rockville Centre NY. Sy is considered the “father of the modern baseball card,” having gone to work for Topps after graduating from Bucknell and then service in World War II, and designing the first Topps set of baseball cards at his kitchen table. He came to personally sign all the Major League players over the next 40 years, establishing the cards as an important part of American culture – and for many, the gateway to America’s pastime. His greatest friend may have been Willie Mays, but he had beloved friendships with thousands of players. Getting one’s picture on a Topps baseball card meant you had “made it.” Football followed, based on a handshake with NFL Commissioner Bert Bell – and then basketball and hockey. Sy handled entertainment products too, including the Beatles. He flew to London to meet with Brian Epstein, greeted him in Yiddish, and made a deal. There was Elvis, Michael Jackson, and much more. Death came peacefully in his sleep of natural causes. Survivors include his wife of 68 years Gloria, a daughter, Maxine Berger, her husband Mark Bienstock and their daughter Amelia…..a son, Glenn and his wife Jeannie, and their children Jonathan, Sarah and Maxwell, and a son Gary and his wife Tipayawan, and their son Jeremy, plus two great grandchildren. Funeral services are pending.

Here’s the NY Times obituary, written by Richard Goldstein.

 

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I have a a few copies of 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die on hand for sale. The cost is $25, postage included, and will be personally autographed as per the customer’s request, ranging from a simple signature to something like ” To ______, the bestest, most handsome, and smartest person I know.”

If you’re interested, send an e-mail for the address to send a check (no credit cards, sorry). At this point, it most likely will not arrive in time for Chanukah or Christmas, which is why the title of this entry is “In the spirit….” But you can always slip an IOU to the recipient or enjoy the sweet anticipation of its arrival.

Happy holidays!

501CoverHR

 

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

As you may have notice in recent weeks, the output on the Bookshelf has been sparse. Received a one-week extension on my new book, which means it will be that much longer until things return to “normal.”

So without further ado, here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. http://www.trbimg.com/img-547d0162/turbine/la-books-guide-nonfiction-20141201-037/600Jeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter
  2. Glory Days in Tribe Town: The Cleveland Indians and Jacobs Field 1994-1997 , by Terry Pluto and Tom Hamilton
  3. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)
  4. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman
  5. 2014 World Series Champions: San Francisco Giants, by Major League Baseball
  6. Derek Jeter: Excellence and Elegance, by The New York Times
  7. Triple Crowned: The San Francisco Giants’ Incredible 2014 Championship Season
  8. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  9. The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter, by Ian O’Connor
  10. The Bill James Handbook 2015

This is the first time I can remember this happening: Each of the top ten titles is an actual book. Usually I have to cull the e-books from the list to get to 10 physical hold-in-your-hands piece of work. Nice to see. Perhaps it’s the gift-giving thing; you can’t really wrap an e-book.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, although it is doing a bit better of late. Still, ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right?

If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

 

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At least not from the Veterans Committee output.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum’s Golden Era Committee announced balloting results Monday for its 2014 election of players, managers, executives and umpires. The ballot featured nine former players and one former executive and was considered by a 16-person committee featuring eight Hall of Famers, four veteran baseball executives and four historians/media members.

Dick Allen, former third baseman and first baseman with Phillies, Cardinals, Dodgers, White Sox and Athletics, and longtime Twins outfielder Tony Oliva each received 11 votes (68.8%) as the top vote-getters.

Dick Allen (11 votes, 68.8%); Tony Oliva (11 votes, 68.8%); Jim Kaat (10 votes, 62.5%); Maury Wills (9 votes, 56.3%); Minnie Minoso (8 votes, 50%); Ken Boyer, Gil Hodges, Bob Howsam, Billy Pierce and Luis Tiant received three or fewer votes each.

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http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/b5/2b/27/b52b27d3d36fbfc6b883c6f70d451830.jpgJust finished a review of the new John Wayne bio for Bookreporter, so I thought it would be appropriate to remind you that he starred in a 1955 television production of Rookie of the Year, aired some 36 years after the Black Sox scandal, which serves as an underscoring theme.

Directed by John Ford, the cast included Wayne as a sportswriter with Ward Bond as a former ballplayer implicated in the scandal, and Patrick Wayne –John’s son — as the son of the shamed Bond who’s trying to make it as a ballplayer himself.

It’s particularly appropriate since the original program aired on Dec. 7.

Enjoy.

 

 

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

As you may have notice in recent weeks, the output on the Bookshelf has been sparse. Barring a stay of execution an extension on my new book, it will remain so until early next month, but the best-sellers go on.

Here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. Jeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter.
  2. Glory Days in Tribe Town: The Cleveland Indians and Jacobs Field 1994-1997 , by Terry Pluto and Tom Hamilton
  3. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)
  4. Derek Jeter: Excellence and Elegance, by The New York Times
  5. 2014 World Series Champions: San Francisco Giants, by Major League Baseball
  6. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  7. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman
  8. The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter, by Ian O’Connor
  9. The Bill James Handbook 2015
  10. A Nice Little Place on the North Side: Wrigley Field at One Hundred, by George F. Will

I’m hoping to find some time to post my suggestions for holiday gift-giving, both new and older titles, soon. Needless to say, 501 would make a nice stocking stuffer.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, although it is doing a bit better of late. Still, ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right?

If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

 

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Headnote: It’s been awhile since my last post. Sorry about that, but the deadline for the Maccabiah book is just about a  month away (barring an extension). But this piece, which comes from my other blog, has a connection to this one as well so here you go.

* * *

I have always aspired to play softball at a high level. In my current situation, I play in a 50-and-over league which means most of the guys have kids who are out of the house, which relieves them of a lot of child-rearing responsibilities. Which, as you might guess, leaves the more hard-core among them with more time to play softball.

As much as I love to play, I could never envision myself playing in three and four leagues at a time, as do some of my leaguemates (a few who are even married), much less making a “career” out of it.

But if I could be involved to that extent, I would want to be like Dave Blackburn, a Paul Bunyanesque character who, in addition to his “secular” competitions, was a staple of Team USA at six Maccabiah Games.

Blackburn was on his way to a game in 2010 when the van he was in was involved in a horrific accident. He was the most seriously injured of his teammates: he broke more than two dozen bones, was placed in a medically-induced coma for two months, and had part of his right leg amputated. Recovery took more than six months.

“He was larger than life: personality, size, and ability,” said Jeff Bukantz. United States chair of Maccabiah Games for in 2013 and again for 2017

In a telephone conversation, Bukantz called Blackburn one of his best friends since they day they met during orientation prior to the 1985 Games.

Dave Blackburn pitching for the U.S. team against Canada at the 17th Maccabiah Games in Israel, July 2009. (Facebook)“I was on the [pay] phone with my wife, about to say goodbye for 17 days… All of a sudden I see this gigantic guy come out in a pro wrestler’s robe and a championship belt. Dave was a softball player, I was a fencer, but here we had something in common because we were both nutty about pro wrestling. So I immediately said to my wife — even though there was no one on line at the time — ‘sorry, there’s a long line here, I gotta go. Love you, goodbye,’ and I went over and immediately introduced myself to Dave and wound up spending the night til about two in the morning telling wrestling stories in the dorm with him and his softball buddies. It was the most random meeting.”

Bukantz has been involved in the Maccabiah since 1981 and aside from his fellow fencers, Blackburn “became my closest friend.” Over the years, in addition to their Maccabiah get-togethers, they visited each other’s homes in California and New Jersey and remained in frequent contact.

Another thing they had in common: both of their fathers competed at extremely high levels in fencing and softball. “We always used to talk about the Halls of Fame that our dads were in… and how proud we were of them. And after we finished talking about our dads, we said ‘Well, what about us? Maybe we could be in some Halls of Fame, too, and follow in our dads’ footsteps.’ We would talk about that and dream about that.”

A few days before the accident, Blackburn called Bukantz to tell him had had been elected to the International Softball Congress Hall of Fame. “I was so happy for him, I said, ‘Dave when is it going to be? Give me the date, I’ll be there.’”

http://fastpitchwest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Dave-Happy-Hanukkah.jpgBukantz’s voice caught a bit as he recalled the details of the injuries and the healing process. “Here was this guy who was like 6’3″, 300 pounds with calves the size of a world -class weight lifter. The guy was mammoth and all of a sudden here he was, sitting in a wheelchair.

“That was sad, but Dave didn’t let you be sad…. Whatever was going on inside of him, he kept a stiff upper lip and he was always laughing, whatever sick jokes we were telling.”

As chair of Team USA in 2013, Bukantz made a decision with Ron Carner and Bob Spivak, president and chair, respectively, of Maccabi USA: “Whatever it takes, we’re going to get Dave there. However it is, however much money we have to raise, whatever the logistics, we’re gonna get Dave there.

“I think Maccabiah was a huge part of his life,” Bukantz said. “We had a three-time rule [limiting athletes to three Maccabiah Games so other can participate]. I think Dave went to six,” because of the importance of the pitcher to softball perhaps more than another other position in any other team event. “And Dave was the man, he was always the man, even as he got older…, he was still our best guy. He took great pride; he was ‘Mr. Maccabiah.’”

Dave Blackburn, shown at center during last week's opening ceremony, is attending the Maccabiah as a paralympian in table tennis after six previous appearances as an able-bodied softball pitcher. (Courtesy Dave Blackburn) Bukantz made Blackburn a banner-bearer for the Opening Ceremonies. Even though he was in charge of the entire U.S. delegation of more than 1,100 athletes, coaches, assistants, and support staff, “I just went down to the infield and stayed with him almost the whole time because I knew it was an important moment in his life, that he lived to make it to this moment, and I wanted to spend it with him.”

The U.S. won the gold medal at every level of softball during those Games: open, juniors, masters. “The plan was that when it was [all] over, as they’re giving the medals out, all the teams would come out, and from each country, everyone who had the number seven would take their [jersey] off and give it to Dave because they were retiring his number…,” Bukantz said.

http://www.jta.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Blackburn-pithing-2013-e1375201013862-350x231.jpgLess than a year later, Blackburn would die of a heart attack at the age of 54.

“You wish you could rewrite history,” Bukantz said. “But if you had to  do it over again, you couldn’t write a better farewell than that one night. It was really something else.”

Blackburn was working on The King & Me, a documentary weaving together the stories of Eddie “the King” Feigner, world famous softball pitcher, showman, and promoter, along with the tale of the Maccabiah Games, the Maccabi USA softball program, and Blackburn’s involvement as primary pitcher on its international traveling softball team.

The project is still on the producers are looking for financial assistance to bring this fitting tribute to fruition. Admittedly, it will be a monumental task to raise the remaining funds in the brief time left, but the holiday season is a time of miracles, isn’t it?

 

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Do cameras still use hot-shoe flash attachments?

Anyway, this was going around Facebook yesterday so I thought I’d pass it along.

For only $3,995, you can be the first kid on the block to own this (the link brings you to the page where each of the 134 cards are identified):

http://siarchives.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/AnselAdams1-300x209.jpgFirst edition, first and only printing. 134 photo-offset lithographic reproductions of photographic portraits printed on individual “trading cards,” with an additional card including a complete checklist of participating photographers. Photographs by Mike Mandel. Texts, statistics and quotes by the respective artists printed on verso (e.g., Ed Ruscha: “Everything you’ve ever wanted is right in your own backyard;” Bobby Heinecken: “…Critics often misspell his last name, hence he is often mistaken for the European beer player.”). Each card 3-1/2 x 2-1/2 inches. Lithographic reproductions printed by Mike Roberts, Berkeley, California. The cards were originally packaged with sticks of chewing gum by Topps Chewing Gum, Brooklyn, New York. In 1975, Mike Mandel traveled around the U.S. with baseball equipment and uniforms to produce a series of portraits of important and influential photographers, curators, art historians and critics. (Note: My emphasis) The resulting cards were, and still are, traded by those in the field. Out of print.

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

On with the show…

Here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. Jeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter.
  2. Glory Days in Tribe Town: The Cleveland Indians and Jacobs Field 1994-1997 , by Terry Pluto and Tom Hamilton
  3. Hardball Times Annual 2015, by Dave Studenmund
  4. The Closer, by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey (Bookreporter.com review)
  5. Derek Jeter: Excellence and Elegance, by The New York Times
  6. Triple Crowned: The San Francisco Giants’ Incredible 2014 Championship Season, by Bay Area News Group
  7. 2014 World Series Champions: San Francisco Giants, by Major League Baseball
  8. Derek Jeter #2: Thanks for the Memories, by David Fischer
  9. The Bill James Handbook 2015
  10. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis

A book about the Cleveland Indians at number two? The Cleveland Indians? All it would have taken was one more Jeter book to knock Moneyball out of the top ten for the first time probably since I’ve been doing these Friday updates.

Not on this list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, although it is doing a bit better of late. Still, ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right? Amazon just got a new shipment and the holidays are just around the corner.

If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have :) .

 

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Sad that more and more of the ballplayers I grew up with, and whose cards I collected, are passing away.

http://www.1960sbaseballprofilesnl2.info/attachments/Image/ray_sadecki.jpgThe latest, Ray Sadecki, died Monday at the age of 73.

Sadecki was a reliable lefty with a lifetime record of 135-131 and a 3.78 ERA for six teams in his 18-year career. He made making his debut with the St. Louis Cardinals as a 19-year-old in 1960, pitching to a 9-9 record. His best season came with the Cardinals in 1964 when he led the World Champions with 20 wins but received no votes for the Cy Young Award (in those days only one trophy was handed out for both leagues.)

He also pitched for the San Francisco Giants, NY Mets, Kansas City Royals, Atlanta Braves, and Milwaukee Brewers.

Sadecki wasn’t a bad hitter, either, with five home runs, 56 RBI, and a .191 batting average.

Kind of surprised the St. Louis Post-Dispatch doesn’t have anything on this, at least not yet.

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It’s only money

November 18, 2014 · 0 comments

But so much of it.

http://www.buckeyestatesports.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Stanton.jpgGiancarlo Stanton, the slugging sensation for the Miami Marlins, just signed a 13-year contract for $325 million.

Let me repeat: 13 years, $325 million.

That’s an average of $25 million per year.

That’s about $154,000 per game.

Until he’s 38.

Let’s say each ball game equals a single work-day (no double headers) and that Stanton plays every game (he has never played in more than 150 games in a season in his five-year career). So that means he gets about $154,000 per work day.

Let’s see, over the course of a calendar year, Joe Sixpack works roughly 244 days — 365 minus weekends and holidays and assuming a two-week paid vacation (which is really 10 days). According to the American Community Survey, “The ACS 2011 U.S. median household income was $51,324 and the ACS 2012 U.S. median household income was $51,371.” Lets round that off to $52,000, just for convenience. So that works out to $213 a game, I mean day.

Just an observation.

By the way, I’m sure there have been studies about the inefficacy of long-term contracts, but I’ll leave them for you to find. Oh, all right, just this one then (warning: that link downloads as a PDF file, so don’t click unless you’re willing to go through all that).

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Baseball best-sellers, Nov. 14

2014 title

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Lest we forget: Al Dark — Update

Autobiography

The pepperpot player and manager died today at the age of 92. I’m guessing this was expected, considering how quickly his obituary appeared on Robinson Funeral Home site. Dark had a 14-year career in the Majors, beginning with the Boston Braves in 1946. After a two-year stint in the military, he returned to the Braves, […]

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I could have predicted that

2014 title

Every spring I get a press release from the New Jersey Institute of Technology announcing the latest predictions about the upcoming baseball season, the work of Bruce Bukiet, associate professor of mathematical sciences. From the 2014 release: Bukiet, who developed a mathematical model for calculating expected MLB win totals that was published in Operations Research, […]

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He’s got a little list.

"Oddballs"

I participated in this seemingly futile exercise to determine “The 25 most important people in baseball,” as posted by the Baseball Past and Present blog. Not players. Not executives. Not men. People. This opens the door for the consideration of personalities like Effa Manley, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Eleanor Engle, Hilda Chester, Ila Borders, Jackie Mitchell, […]

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All that glitters is not necessarily a Gold Glove

"Ripped from today's headlines..."

Because you can certainly put trophies on your bookshelf. Ian Kinsler lost to Boston Red Sox Dustin Pedroia for the American League Gold Glove Award for second basemen. He did, however, pick up the Wilson Defensive Player of the Year award. The Gold Gloves are award by Rawlings, a sporting goods company and one of […]

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Baseball best-sellers, Nov. 7

"Annuals"

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Lest we forget: Brad Halsey

"Ripped from today's headlines..."

The former Diamondback, Yankee, and As pitcher died last Friday as the result of fall in a climbing accident. The exact circumstances surrounding his demise remain unclear after an autopsy. Be sociable, share the Bookshelf! Tweet

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The slate is in for Casey Award finalists

2014 title

From the editors of Spitball Magazine, here are the finalists for the 2014 CASEY Award for Best Baseball Book of the Year: Brooks: The Biography of Brooks Robinson, by Doug Wilson The Chalmers Race: Ty Cobb, Napoleon Lajoie, and the Controversial 1910 Batting Title that Became a National Obsession, by Rick Huhn The Fight of […]

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