Extra, extra… or not

February 20, 2017 · 0 comments

Been shirking my duties as a blogger here for any number of reasons: working on my own book, looking for full-time work, other blogs, ranting on Facebook (not necessarily in that order). But one of the things I wanted to mention was the misguided attempt by MLB to try to cater to people who maybe shouldn’t be watching baseball in the first place.

Ihttps://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vOT2NS0YL._AC_US160_.jpgf you can’ stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. And if you can’t stand extra innings, don’t come out to the ballpark or watch. In fact, when it comes to the latter, you are the master of your domain; simply turn it off or change the channel.

Baseball is too slow, some say. You know what? That’s one of the selling points. A nice leisurely get-together with family and friends on a warm summer’s evening. Perhaps no time limits make things less dramatic. Try telling that to the nail-biters when their team is down to their last at-bat with men on base and trailing.

I used to track games at Mets and Yankees games for STATS Inc. And since I didn’t drive to the ballparks, I had to get out of there in time to make the last bus or train home to New Jersey. Once the clock struck 10:30 or so, I started to sweat. Same if the game went into extras. But I would never want to see the likes of what they’re suggesting: putting a runner on second to start the inning. Ugh. Look at all the fun contests there have been, and the pride in saying you saw the whole thing, either in person or on the tube.

Here is one take on the ridiculousness of such a plan.

According to the writer,

The open-ended nature of extra-innings contests fueled both record books and literary imaginations. W.P. Kinsella’s novel “The Iowa Baseball Confederacy” was about a game that lasted more than 2,000 innings. The pro baseball record is 33, for a 1981 contest between minor league affiliates of the Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles. That game inspired the book “Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game,” by Dan Barry, a columnist for The New York Times.

Here’s another commentary, courtesy of John Thorn, official MLB historian. And, of course, the Times has to weigh in. And The Sporting News, formerly known as the “bible of baseball” before things went south, which calls the idea “extra dumb.”

Although I will say that one bad thing about extra innings is that it has lead to a decided lack of imagination when it comes to coming up with book titles.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. https://d1vxgwos21rroi.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/imagecache/product_full/MLBA17_200w_0.jpgBaseball Prospectus 2017
  2. Baseball America 2017 Prospect Handbook: Rankings and Reports of the Best Young Talent in Baseball (Feb. 28)
  3. 2017 Baseball Forecaster: & Encyclopedia of Fanalytics by Ron Shandler
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones with Carroll Rogers Walton
  6. The Matheny Manifesto: A Young Manager’s Old-School Views on Success in Sports and Life, by Mick Matheny with Jerry Jenkins
  7. Coaching Youth Baseball the Ripken Way, by Cal Ripken Jr. and Bill Ripken with Scott Lowe
  8. The Fantasy Baseball Black Book 2017 Edition, by Joe Pasapia
  9. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  10. 2017 Minor League Baseball Analyst, by Jeremy Deloney

* Making its debut on the Bookshelf Best-Seller List

The honeymoon is over. For the first time in quite awhile, no Cubs books. About half of the titles seemed to be concerned with putting your fantasy team together. A couple of others consider baseball as taught to young people.

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. Baseball America Prospect Guide
  3. Baseball Prospectus 2017 (Kindle)

Most Wished For

  1. Baseball Prospectus
  2. The Cubs Way
  3. Moneyball

NY Times monthly sports best-seller list: No baseball books listed in the February rolls.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 942,716; last week: 481,932. The usual up-and-down. I will be appearing on a couple of podcasts in the not-too-distant future, so that might bump up sales a tad. The reverse is true for my forthcoming Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War currently ranks 831,109, up from last week’s 1,047,353.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. https://d1vxgwos21rroi.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/imagecache/product_full/MLBA17_200w_0.jpgBaseball Prospectus 2017
  2. 2017 Baseball Forecaster: & Encyclopedia of Fanalytics by Ron Shandler
  3. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  4. Sports Illustrated Chicago Cubs 2016 World Series Champions Commemorative Issue
  5. 2017 Minor League Baseball Analyst, by Jeremy Deloney *
  6. Teammate: My Life in Baseball, by David Ross with Don Yeager
  7. The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told: Thirty Unforgettable Tales from the Diamond, by Jeff Silverman
  8. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  9. The Bill James Handbook 2017
  10. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law (April 25)

* Making its debut on the Bookshelf Best-Seller List

Nothing new worth writing about.

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. Baseball America Prospect Guide
  3. Baseball Prospectus 2017 (Kindle)

Most Wished For

  1. Smart Baseball
  2. Moneyball
  3. Baseball Prospectus

NY Times monthly sports best-seller list:No baseball books listed in the February rolls.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 481,932; last week: 1,124,517. Nice. I will be appearing on a couple of podcasts in the not-too-distant future, so that might bump up sales a tad. The reverse is true for my forthcoming Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War currently ranks 1,047,353, greatly down from last week’s 624,376.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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When Jackie ‘met’ Hank

February 10, 2017 · 0 comments

This year marks the 70th anniversary of Jackie Robinson‘s major league debut. Which means it’s also the 70th anniversary of the game in which he collided at first base with Hank Greenberg, playing in his final season with the Pittsburgh Pirates an ignominious release by the Detroit Tigers with which he had a Hall of Fame career. Good timing when it comes to a little shameless self-promotion in that the incident comprises a full chapter in my forthcoming book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War.

I won’t go into all that here. For one thing, Paul Guggenheimer does a nice job of recapping the story in this piece in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. For another, it gives me the chance to urge you to buy my book.

It’s in the final production stages, having gone through several rounds of editing and the insertion of the index and photos. Nothing for me to do now but wait for all the bags of money to roll in (that’s a joke, son). There are a few interviews and appearances in the works, so that’s nice. Always an exciting time for an author and it passes way too quickly.

Sadly, there’s no photo of Greenberg and Robinson together, at least none of which I’m aware. If you know of one, I’d love to hear about it.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. https://i.harperapps.com/covers/9780062490223/y450-293.pngBaseball Prospectus 2017
  2. Baseball America 2017 Prospect Handbook: Rankings and Reports of the Best Young Talent in Baseball (February 28)
  3. 2017 Baseball Forecaster: & Encyclopedia of Fanalytics by Ron Shandler
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci  (March 28)
  6. Smart Baseball: The Story Behind the Old Stats That Are Ruining the Game, the New Ones That Are Running It, and the Right Way to Think About Baseball, by Keith Law (April 25) *
  7. Sports Illustrated Chicago Cubs 2016 World Series Champions Commemorative Issue
  8. Catapult Loading System: How To Teach 100-Pound Hitters To Consistently Drive The Ball 300-Feet, by Joey Myers
  9. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  10. Baseball America 2017 Almanac: Comprehensive Review of the 2016 Season

* Making its debut on the Bookshelf Best-Seller List

Keith Law, a baseball analyst for ESPN, offers another…well, analysis on the state of the game, particularly as it relates to how statistics are used. All due respect, but how is this the #1 best-seller in the category “Business Facility Management?”

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. Baseball America Prospect Guide
  3. 2017 Baseball Forecaster

Most Wished For

  1. Moneyball
  2. Baseball Prospectus
  3. The Cubs Way

NY Times monthly sports best-seller list:No baseball books listed in the February rolls.

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,124,517; last week: 834,724. Ugh. I will be appearing on a couple of podcasts in the not-too-distant future, so that might bump up sales a tad. My forthcoming Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War currently ranks 624,376, greatly improved from last week’s 1,403,892.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. http://images.penguinrandomhouse.com/cover/9780804190015Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. 2017 Baseball Forecaster: & Encyclopedia of Fanalytics by Ron Shandler
  3. Baseball America 2017 Prospect Handbook: Rankings and Reports of the Best Young Talent in Baseball (February 28)
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. Baseball America 2017 Almanac: Comprehensive Review of the 2016 Season
  6. The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse, by Tom Verducci * (March 28)
  7. Born to Play: My Life in the Game, by Dustin Pedroia with Edward J. Delaney
  8. Sports Illustrated Chicago Cubs 2016 World Series Champions Commemorative Issue
  9. Catapult Loading System: How To Teach 100-Pound Hitters To Consistently Drive The Ball 300-Feet, by Joey Myers
  10. Heads-Up Baseball : Playing the Game One Pitch at a Time, by Ken Ravizza

* Making its debut on the Bookshelf Best-Seller List

Veteran baseball writer Tom Verducci weighs in with his take on the Chicago Cubs’ thrilling season. Apropos of nothing, Dustin Pedroia’s 2009 memoir finds a place in the top 10.

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. 2017 Baseball Forecaster
  3. Baseball America Prospect Guide

Most Wished For

  1. Moneyball
  2. Baseball Prospectus
  3. Ballplayer, by Chipper Jones

NY Times monthly sports Best-Sellers list: the Cubs book put out by MLB is #11. No other baseball title unless you want to include Joe Buck’s Lucky Bastard (which I don’t. By the way, and not that I care, but doesn’t a title like that get him banned from places like WalMart?).

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 834,724; last week: 1,387,142. Nice. I will be appearing on a couple of podcasts in the not-too-distant future, so that might bump up sales a tad. My forthcoming Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War currently ranks 1,403,892, down from last week’s 750,996 but I’m not worried; I expect that to change dramatically as release date gets closer.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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Mazel tov to Michael Leahy, winner of the 2016 CASEY Award presented by Spitball: The Literary Baseball Magazine, as the best baseball book of the year for The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers. It is certainly one of my all-time favorites; if I ever get a chance to redo 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, it will certainly be included.

From the Spitball site:

Michael Leahy is the winner of the 2016 CASEY Award for Best Baseball Book of the Year for The Last Innocents: The Collision of the Turbulent Sixties and the Los Angeles Dodgers (published by HarperCollins Publishers). In garnering two first-place votes and a third-place vote (for a five point total), Leahy handily outdistanced the formidable competition. Spitball Editor Mike Shannon said, “Mr. Leahy gives us such a transformative view of a famous team and the struggles its key players endured that it’s like encountering them for the first time. Even San Francisco Giants fans will experience new appreciation for these admirable Dodgers. The Judges clearly recognized the achievement represented by the book.” As Judge Zach Sanzone said, “The Last Innocents succeeds in mixing history with an examination of important social attitudes that are as relevant today as they were in the 1960s. All the Finalists’ books demonstrated excellent insight into the world of baseball, but the level of scholarship,  writing, and depth found in Michael Leahy’s book made it stand out above the others.”

The Arm by Jeff Passan finished second (nine points), while The Selling of the Babe by Glenn Stout finished third (11 points).

michael-leahy-berginoLeahy will receive his award at the 34th annual CASEY Awards Banquet on Sunday, March 12, at Crosley’s Sports Bar & Eatery (4901 Vine Street, Cincinnati) in the St. Bernard Square shopping center. Attendance is open to the public; tickets will be available at the door for $10 per person. Admittance includes a one-year subscription to Spitball.

I had the pleasure meeting Leahy at an author event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse in Manhattan last fall.  He was also a scintillating guest for a Bookshelf conversation which you can listen to here and here.  Finally, here’s the review I wrote for Bookreporter.com.

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Mazel tov to Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, and Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez on their election to the Baseball Hall of Fame. That’s the good news.

The (relatively) bad news is that they played for teams in markets that don’t necessarily lend themselves to glamor and glitz. Bagwell spent his entire 15-year career with the Houston Astros. In 23 years, Raines played primarily for the Montreal Expos before moving on to the White Sox and Yankees before pit stops in Oakland, Baltimore, and Miami. And Rodriguez spent most of his 21 years with the Texas Rangers before going to the Texas Rangers and spending smaller chunks of time with the Marlins, Yankees, Nationals, and Astros.

Not exactly the marquee locations for generating books, all due respect to the teams and their fans.

This is what we have so far for the trio:

Ivan Rodriguez

Tim Raines

Jeff Bagwell

  • Nothing yet.

Interestingly, both the Rodriguez and Raines books are published by triumph. It’s as if they knew something. They’re like witches!

Another factoid, pointed out by the good folks at Pardon the Interruption: all three have been associated with drug use. Raines imbibed in cocaine back in the day ( recreational drug, but still), while Rodriguez and Bagwell had their names come up in PED rumors.

 

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NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on with the show…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way,” which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main.

  1. Baseindexball Prospectus 2017
  2. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  3. 2017 Baseball Forecaster: & Encyclopedia of Fanalytics by Ron Shandler
  4. Sports Illustrated Chicago Cubs 2016 World Series Champions Commemorative Issue
  5. Heads-Up Baseball : Playing the Game One Pitch at a Time, by Ken Ravizza
  6. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams and John Underwood
  7. The Natural, by Bernard Malamud
  8. Baseball America 2017 Almanac: Comprehensive Review of the 2016 Season
  9. The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports, by Jeff Passan
  10. The Bill James Handbook 2017

* Making its debut on the Bookshelf Best-Seller List

The usual suspects. Four of the top 10 take a look back at last season and a look ahead to the upcoming (pitchers and catchers less than a month away!).

MORE lists: Amazon has started a couple of new ones, including “Hot New Releases” and “Most Wished For.” A look at the top three in each, which have remained the same since last week:

Hot New Releases

  1. Baseball Prospectus 2017
  2. 2017 Baseball Forecaster
  3. Fantasy Baseball Black Book 2017 (Kindle)

Most Wished For

  1. Moneyball
  2. Baseball Prospectus
  3. Sports Illustrated Cubs edition

NY Times monthly sports Best-Sellers list: the Cubs book put out by MLB is #11. No other baseball title unless you want to include Joe Buck’s Lucky Bastard (which I don’t. By the way, and not that I care, but doesn’t a title like that get him banned from places like WalMart?).

Not on either the Amazon or Times‘ lists? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. Today: 1,387,142; last week: 1,316,749. Still going the wrong way, folks. My forthcoming Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War currently ranks 750,996, up from last week’s 1,011,885.

If you have read 501, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page; it’s never too late. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

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The Cubs visited the White House today. How cool is it that the president is one of their own?

In what President Barack Obama said was “the last official event at the White House in my presidency,” the avowed White Sox fan was treated to quite a number of gifts from the World Series champion Cubs, including a “OBAMA 44” jersey, a #44 Wrigley Field scoreboard panel, a “W” flag signed by the entire team, and a lifetime pass for him and his family to Wrigley, which he noted said “NON TRANSFERABLE, to general laughter.

Cubs GM Theo Epstein issued a “pardon” to Obama for rooting for the cross-town Sox.

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Been busy finalizing my forthcoming book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which has severely reduced my Bookshelf time. (Even got my first blurb! Very cool.) So in attempt to play catch-up…

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http://www.hitnrun.us/wp-content/uploads/MLK-Day.jpgMonday at 9 a.m.

From the posting by the Hall of Fame

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is not only for celebration, remembrance, education and tribute, but above all a day of service. Join us as we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day through guided tours and museum programs, and learn about Hall of Famers Roberto Clemente, Jackie Robinson and others that emulate Dr. King’s service and humanitarianism.

Here’s a look back at the Bookshelf post from last year.

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Baseball Best-Sellers, January 13, 2017

"Annuals"

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on […]

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What a nice surprise: Books of the day

"Oddballs"

I had to go to my local library site to renew some stuff and saw this: Also someone stopped by the house to have me sign a copy of 501 Baseball Books. That hasn’t happened for awhile. Sweet.   Be sociable, share the Bookshelf! Tweet

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I’ll be the judge of that

2007 title

If you’ve been following this blog for any length of time, you know I have an aversion to hyperbole. Words like “greatest” or “best” or “ever” or “forever” have always raised a red flag for me because the majority of the time, they’re not. It may be unfair because I haven’t read this one save […]

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Baseball Best-Sellers, January 6, 2017

"Annuals"

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on […]

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Perfect timing for a little SSP (Hank Greenberg project)

2017 Title

(As in “shameless self-promotion.”) Actually yesterday would have been the perfect time as it would have been Hank Greenberg‘s 106th birthday. Considering that Tyrus Wong, illustrator for the classic Walt Disney flick Bambi, recently died at that age, it’s not outside the realm of possibility that Hammerin’ Hank could still be with us. As you […]

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Baseball Best-Sellers, December 30, 2016

2016 title

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on […]

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Lest we forget: Peter Horvitz

History

The teacher and lecturer who published The Big Book of Jewish Baseball with his son Joachim, died in Raleigh, NC, last Saturday at the age of 71. This was one of those Jewish “reference books” I’m betting a lot of kids received as a bar mitzva or Hanukka present. Horvitz also wrote The Big Book […]

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Brought to you as a public service announcement (baseball movies on Netflix)

Movies

Looking for baseball pics on Netflix? Type this in after you sign in and it will take you right there: https://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/12339 You’re welcome. Be sociable, share the Bookshelf! Tweet

Be sociable, share the Bookshelf!
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