NEW STUFF: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So…

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

  1. http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tY5NiEkYL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgPedro, by Pedro Martinez and Michael Silverman.
  2. Billy Martin: Baseball’s Flawed Genius, by Bill Pennington
  3. 100 Things A’s Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die, by Susan Slusser
  4. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  5. Jeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter. (Bookshelf review here).
  6. The Mental Game of Baseball: A Guide to Peak Performance, by H.A. Dorfman
  7. Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life in the Minor Leagues of Baseball, by John Feinstein
  8. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams
  9. Championship Blood: The 2014 World Series Champion San Francisco Giants, by Brian Murphy
  10. The Mental ABC’s of Pitching: A Handbook for Performance Enhancement, by Dorfman

Here’s the April list of New York Times sports best-seller list (10 plus 10 more). Jeter Unfiltered comes in at number six, while Feinstein’s Where Nobody Knows Your Name is 12.

The book about As Fans replaces Jim Kaat’s If These Walls Could Talk as the Triumph Publishing entry for the week. Kaat was recently interviewed on The Brian Lehrer Show (you can hear it here) and will be at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse on May 8. RSVPs are strongly recommended. In fact, it might already be sold out but check on the Bergino website.

I wonder how many pro players have read any of the Dorfman books?

Not on either list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. As of this post, the ranking is 328, 313, up a bit from 541,098 last week, but we can do better so ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right? Just one or two purchases can move a book up several thousand spots. If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

 

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Since I posted the first of these on a Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric. These are kind of fun; it’s like a box of chocolates — you never know what you’re gonna get. (Actually, I never understood that famous quote from Forrest Gump. If it’s a box of chocolate covered cherries, don’t you know exactly what you’re going to get?)

As a reminder,

I highly recommend Pocket as a way to hold onto links you come that you want to keep. Unlike bookmarks, Pocket keeps the entire page and makes it relative easy for you to find stuff you “pocketed.” I have keepers going back six years — more than 5,000 links — and I’ve decided it’s time to start cleaning house so here are some submitted for your amusement, perusal, and education. Some are not current, but in a sense, they’re timeless. They’re presented in reverse order (oldest first).

  • Here are a couple of videos of Rabbi Rebecca Alpert, author of Out of Left Field: Jews and Black Baseball. By they way, can we have a moratorium on that title? There are at least a half-dozen books of wildly varying subject matter, that have the same name.
  • Marty Noble published this piece on “The songs — and sport — of summer resonate” on MLB.com almost four years ago.
  • While we’re debating the legitimacy of Alex Rodriguez’s accomplishments as he sits on 659 home runs, here’s a look back at Derek Jeter’s 3,000 hit milestone by former Major Leaguer and current author/broadcaster Doug Glanville from the July 7, 2011 New York Times opinion section.
  • Here’s a digital reproduction of John Montgomery Ward’s 1888 book, Base Ball: How to Become a Player from Archive.org. Very cool.
  • The title of this one piqued my interest, but frankly I’m not going to spend the money for the sake of a small portion about baseball. I wonder who made the decision to title is thus. Sure seems better than the options offered by the other essays.
  • One of these days I’m going to speak with John Torn about the updated release of The Hidden Game of Baseball. I imagine one of the questions will be along the lines of what does it take for a “new” statistic to be adopted into baseball’s numerical canon? I was reminded of that from this piece, “Simple WAR Calculator.” Sine it was originally published almost three and a half years ago, I wonder if there’s been any revision on the formulas?
  • Another thoughtful piece by Doug Glanville on retirement.
  • Sports photography by one of the masters, Walter Ioos, Jr.
  • I have often expressed my old-school preference for baseball attire: Keep your jersey tucked in until you get to the clubhouse (are they that uncomfortable that some players just can’t wait?); keep your hat on straight; and knickers, not pajamas. I took it for granted that sports writers and broadcasters would dress appropriately. Guess I was wrong.
  • Is it fair to review a movie that is basically created for a niche audience by the same standards as regular features? After all, many of these are produced, directed, and otherwise staffed — including actors — by non-professionals. In this case we’re talking about Mill Town Pride, a 2011 offering that is certainly spiritual in purpose. 

 

 

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Some of you might be old enough to remember a time when for one admission at the movie theater, you got a double feature, a cartoon, and maybe a short subject.

Welcome back.

http://www.impawards.com/2014/thumbs/sq_no_no_a_dockumentary.jpgThis week I finally had a chance to watch No No: A Dockumentary, about the life and wild times of Dock Ellis, an African-American pitcher, primarily with  the Pittsburgh Pirates, but also spending part of his 12-year career with the NY Yankees, Oakland As, Texas Rangers, and NY Mets, before coming full circle with the Buccos before retiring in 1979.

I expected No No to be a neo-typical Ken Burnsian type of project and was pleasantly surprise. Sure, many of those elements — the photos, the talking heads — were present; how can you avoid that these days. But the production values were high and went a long way in creating a drug-induced quality. I still find it hard to believe Ellis’ claim that he pitched every one of his Major League games –345 according to Baseball-Reference — high. Of course, “high” is a relative term. No No is very thorough in explaining the rampant use of amphetamines in helping players get through the grueling season.

Ellis’ main claim to fail was his revelation that he pitched his no-hitter against the San Diego Padres on June 12, 1970 under the influence of LSD. I assumed that would be the heart of No No. But it covers a lot more territory, including the continuing difficulties of African-American players in the turbulent sixties and seventies and high points (you should pardon the expression) of Ellis career, including the first all-black lineup to take the field.

His addictions finally caught up to him, and Ellie became a substance abuse counselor towards the end of his life. He was memorialized on screen by several of his old friends. It was also bittersweet to see his former teammates, including Enos Cabell, Bob Oliver, Bob Watson, Steve Blass, Bruce Kison, and others, recall the wild and crazy days.

Funny and sad at the same time, No No: A Documentary won for best editing category at the Boulder International Film Festival in 2014 and was for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance. Well-deserved.

* * *

The “selected short” for the week is The Schedule Makers, a “30 for 30″ ESPN production.

This charming piece, weighing in at just under 13 minutes, gives a brief overview into the process that was handled by what amounts to a mom-and-pop business, although Holly and Henry Stephenson, who created the scheduled for MLB from 1982-2004, might bristle at that categorization.

http://a.espncdn.com/30for30/prod/assets/images/screenShot/schedulemakers.jpg

Most of the information for The Schedule Makers — directed by Joseph Garner and produced by Eve Marson — comes directly from the Stephensons. The only other on-screen commentator is baseball writer/broadcaster Buster Olney. Since there is a lot of math involved, along with terms like “combinational optimization,” I’ll just say that there’s a tremendous amount of consideration that goes into the process. Not the least of this are the special requests made by the team for a season that includes 30 teams playing more than 2,400 games over 180 days and close to one million miles of travel. For example, the Boston Red Sox always want to be home for Patriots Day. Other teams may or may not want to be around when other local events are taking place. When Cal Ripken Jr. set the all-time record for consecutive games played, the Stephenson’s had to calculate when that would happen so that event could take place in Baltimore.

Then there’s the weather. Planning games in April on the East Coast has its own set of concerns, as we learn.

Perhaps because they weren’t big-time mathematicians from MIT, the Stephensons had to “prove themselves” year after year.  MLB finally replaced them in 2005 in favor of computer-generated programs. That obviously wasn’t foolproof. If it was, we wouldn’t have had NY Yankees future Hall of Famer Mariano Rivera winding finishing up his career against in 2013 the Astros in Houston.

According to Holly Stephenson, creating the schedules was somewhat akin to building jigsaw puzzles. She must be talking about the 5,000-piece versions, because this stuff is damn hard, at least to this layman.

You can watch the entire mini-doc right here. You’re welcome.

 

 

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Haven’t been keeping up lately because I had to read a non-baseball sports book for review. That’ll teach me.

Out of respect for the book, which was assigned to me by a publication I will similarly not name, let’s just say it falls into this category. To make matters worse, I did not do due diligence; thought this was non-fiction, but instead it was a self-published novel. I was about to give up on it and tell the editor I would not, in good conscience, be able to give the book anywhere near a positive review, but I was told that wasn’t necessary, so I plowed through, anxious to get this over with and off my plate. Like liver.

As you know, I dislike reviewing fiction. That’s usually because I was not an English major, don’t know how to properly explain grammar (my philosophy is akin to “I don’t know art, but I know what I like”), and therefore feel inadequate when it comes to critiquing the genre. But in this case, I have no such qualms. I was amazed to see it got a five-star review, the only one on the book’s Amazon page. What was this person thinking, I wondered, that he can be so glowing. Or is it that I’m so mean?

As I said, I may not grok grammar, but I know how to compose a sentence, how to use punctuation, how to create believable dialogue (he said, using air quotes). All these components were absent in great part from this book. Notice I’m not talking about spelling here; that’s for you, M.A. Sometimes I feel I have to make a few mistakes, to steal a moment from The King’s Speech:

I get it that a lot of fledgling authors are turning to self-publishing. When I began writing, I was thrilled to see my name in the byline. But each piece went through several iterations, with people looking the article over, before it was submitted as final. And even then, corrections were often made. I urge you folks, don’t be in such a rush. If you want to be taken seriously, invest the time (and money, if necessary) in finding a second pair of eyes to look over your work. It can only help.

Well, that’s done, at least. Now I can get back to the comfort food that is baseball literature.

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Ain’t misbehavin’

April 24, 2015 · 0 comments

“No one to talk with, all by myself…”

Didn’t post a Bookshelf Conversation last week, and won’t have one this week either. That’s a shame because I enjoy a good chat with creative people, getting to know what their process is, how they go to this point in their work, etc.

As a sneak preview, future conversations will include Jeff Katz, author of the forthcoming Split Season: 1981: Fernandomania, the Bronx Zoo, and the Strike that Saved Baseball (and the mayor of Cooperstown!); artist Gary Cieradkowski, who is also about to release his book, The League of Outsider Baseball: An Illustrated History of Baseball’s Forgotten Heroes; and Jennifer Ring, author of A Game of Their Own: Voices of Contemporary Women in Baseball.

Stay tuned.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61SM%2B0q1JML._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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NEW STUFF: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So…

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message.

So without further ado, here are the top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com, as of this posting.

Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); because I’m old school.

Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read them. But it’ll be close enough for government work.

Caveat 3: Sometimes they’ll try to pull one over on you and include a book within a category that doesn’t belong. I’m using my discretion to eliminate such titles from my list. For example, for some reason a recent listing included Tarnished Heels: How Unethical Actions and Deliberate Deceit at the University of North Carolina Ended the “The Carolina Way”, which, far as I can tell, is not at all about baseball, at least not in the main. For the sake of brevity, I will be omitting the subtitles, which have become ridiculously long in in some cases in recent years, also at my discretion.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nWAlP9r9L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

  1. Billy Martin: Baseball’s Flawed Genius, by Bill Pennington
  2. If These Walls Could Talk: New York Yankees: Stories from the New York Yankees Dugout, Locker Room, and Press Box, by Jim Kaat
  3. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis
  4. Jeter Unfiltered, by Derek Jeter. (Bookshelf review here).
  5. The Mental Game of Baseball: A Guide to Peak Performance, by H.A. Dorfman
  6. The Science of Hitting, by Ted Williams
  7. Championship Blood: The 2014 World Series Champion San Francisco Giants, by Brian Murphy
  8. Baseball Prospectus 2015
  9. 100 Things Orioles Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die, by Dan Connolly
  10. The Real McCoy: My Half Century with the Cincinnati Reds, by Hal McCoy

Here’s the April list of New York Times sports best-seller list (10 plus 10 more). Jeter Unfiltered comes in at number six, while John Feinstein’s Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life in the Minor Leagues of Baseball is 12.

A couple of titles from Triumph Publishing — If These Walls Could Talk and 100 Things — make it to the list this week. Triumph specializes in sports books and these are parts of two of their many series. I’m not a huge fan of these anecdotal/listical styles, but I do see how tailoring them for regional audiences makes sense.

By the Way, Jim Kaat will be at an author event at the Begino Baseball Clubhouse on Friday, May 8.

Not on either list? 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. As of this post, the ranking is 541,098, down from 242,810 last week. Ya’ll are gonna do something about that, right? Just one or two purchases can move a book up several thousand spots. If you have read it, thanks, hope you enjoyed it, and please consider writing a review for the Amazon page. There haven’t been any in awhile. Doesn’t have to be long (or even complimentary, if you didn’t like it), but anything would be appreciated. And thanks to those who have.

 

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A-Rod who?

April 23, 2015 · 0 comments

As in  “What would (Brandon) Steiner do?”

Pardon the Interruption has a regular feature in which the co-hosts discuss whether an event or story if “Something or nothing.” That’s the first thing that came to mind when I saw a front-page story in today’s New York Times titled “Alex Rodriguez’s Quest Is Going, Going … Unobserved.”

The article, by Billy Witz, points out that Alex Rodriguez is just two home runs away from tying Willie Mays for fourth on the all-time list with 660. Yet you wouldn’t know it because the Yankees, at least internally, aren’t promoting it. There isn’t the lovefest there was when Derek Jeter was approaching 3,000 hits or Mariano Rivera retired.

From the NY Times' story: " Rodriguez hitting the 658th home run of his career on Friday. Credit Chris O'Meara/Associated Press"

From the Times‘ piece:

When Rivera left the field in his Yankees finale in 2013, it was a scripted affair, with his longtime teammates Jeter and Andy Pettitte walking to the mound to remove him, a gesture that brought Rivera to tears.

When Jeter reached 3,000 hits with a straight-out-of-Hollywood home run at Yankee Stadium, his teammates and his coaches emptied out of the dugout to meet him at home plate. As the crowd stood and cheered, Jeter embraced each teammate, including Rodriguez, who could be heard telling him, “That’s unbelievable.”

First of all, I’d like to recognize that both Jeter and Rivera were home-grown products who spent their entire professional careers with the Yankees. Rodriguez came to the team when he was 28 and in his 11th Major League season, with 345 homers already in the bank. I believe there’s a big difference between accumulating all your numbers with one team and splitting them up, so I can understand this wouldn’t be as big a deal for the Yankees.

But there are a couple other issues, aren’t there?

First of all, there’s the PED business. Rodriguez missed more than a year out on suspension. The Yankees wanted to dump him then and there, having been a headache for too long. It got to a point where they were so high-and-mighty with their righteous indignation (and they desire to  save millions in salary), that they turned him into something of a sympathetic character.

Remember when Barry Bonds was approaching Hank Aaron’s all-time home run record of 755? There was a lot of chirping about that, too. People demurred, saying Bonds had cheated, that Aaron was still the one true king. Would then-commissioner Bud Selig be on hand for the record-breaking moment, or would he stay away, unwilling to offer even tacit approval by his presence.

It does seem cheesey for the Yankees to notify the media that “Brett Gardner, with 185 stolen bases, needed one to pass Wid Conroy for sole possession of sixth place in team history,” or “Andrew Miller needed to pitch one and a third innings to reach 500 for his career,” but not a major milestone like 660 home runs.

Oh, and by the way? Rodriguez is just 48 hits away from 3,000.

Memorabilia dealer Brandon Steiner notoriously misses no opportunity to make a buck off fans’ desire to “own a piece of history.,” For crying out loud, the man even sold groundskeepers’ brooms! So I wonder what will come out on top: the desire to separate fans from their money, or a protest against A-Rod.

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Since I posted the first of these on a Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric.

As a reminder,

I highly recommend Pocket as a way to hold onto links you come that you want to keep. Unlike bookmarks, Pocket keeps the entire page and makes it relative easy for you to find stuff you “pocketed.” I have keepers going back six years — more than 5,000 links — and I’ve decided it’s time to start cleaning house so here are some submitted for your amusement, perusal, and education. Some are not current, but in a sense, they’re timeless. They’re presented in reverse order (oldest first).

So here goes…

 

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The veteran sportswriter for the Philadelphia Daily News for more than 50 years passed away on April 9 at the age of 86. A “celebration of life” service was held on April 12 at the Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel in Elkins Park.

I met Hochman in 2012 at a Jewish baseball retreat in Connecticut. He was one of those neat old-school scribes with a thousand stories to tell. Here are some links for your perusal:

http://media.philly.com/images/600*450/20150410_dn_g1hofm10s.JPG

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Coming around again

April 21, 2015 · 0 comments

Came across this from The Wall Street Journal via a Facebook post:

Here’s a Perplexing Question to Bat Around

What does it mean to “bat around” in baseball? Is it the situation when nine batters come to the plate in one inning? Or is it 10?

At first I thought it was so simple. Has to be 10. Imagine a circle: Wouldn’t you have to return to the starting point to complete a cycle?When you get there, you’ve come “full circle.” Is that the same as coming around, or do you have to go past that point?

This borders on math, so I’m outta here.

I’m sure there’s something in the Talmud that addresses the situation.

By the way, the Washington Post did their own story on this. So are we going to have another ridiculous internet debate along the lines of “What color is the dress?” or “Is the cat going up the stairs or down the stairs?”

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http://www.gelfmagazine.com/images/articles/VL_logo_newer.jpgWish I’d had more advance notice on this, but…

Varsity Letters returns to the Gallery at Le Poisson Rouge on Thursday, April 23, for a look at all things baseball.

Legendary broadcaster Ed Lucas and his son Chris will discuss their new memoir, Seeing Home: The Ed Lucas Story: A Blind Broadcaster’s Story of Overcoming Life’s Greatest Obstacles.

They’ll be joined by Matthew Silverman, a die-hard Mets fan and author of Baseball Miscellany: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Baseball.

The free event will take place at The Gallery at LPR in Manhattan’s West Village, 158 Bleecker St. (between Sullivan St. and Thompson St.), NYC. Attendees must be 21 or older, as per LPR rules. (E-mail michael@gelfmagazine.com if you are under 21 and would like to attend the events.)

Doors open at 7:00. Event starts at 7:30.

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http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/04/17/dick-flavin-d7cbfef87c2eccf191d89a0dc1c4a666ca29cc6c-s300-c85.jpgThe “poet laureate”/PA announcer for the Red Sox was the guest for the “Not My Job” segment of last week’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, which was broadcast from the Wang Theater in the City Performing Arts Center in Boston. You can read the transcript or listen to Flavin — along with host Peter Sagal, emcee Bill Kurtis, and panelist Faith Salie — here

An example of Flavin’s work:

Carl Yastrzemski, he wore number eight.
In the bat, in the field and at bat, my God he was great.
For 23 years he carried the load.
A player like that deserves his own ode.
But here is the rub, Yastrzemski won’t rhyme
with any word I’ve been able to find.
I’ve lain awake nights, I’ve done the research,
but found not one rhyme. I am left in the lurch.
There just is no rhyme to go with Yastrzemski,
and take that from one who has made the attemptski.

While doing a little research, I came across The Great Fenway Park Writers Series. Who knew? According to the organization’s website:

The Great Fenway Park Writers Series is the only literary series sponsored by a professional sports team – ever. That the Boston Red Sox are the team behind such a sponsorship should come as no surprise.

(Well, Peter Sagal did preface the NMJ segmentby saying “Everybody knows the…Red Sox are unique — in that they have the most pretentious, literary fans in all of baseball. Sure, the Yankees may have more World Championships, but only Red Sox fans routinely compare their team to the tragic heroes of Greek Drama.”)

More about Mr. Flavin:

Here he reads one of his poems to the “crowd” at Fenway after the Sox won the 2013 World Series.

And here’s a 45+ minute video of Flavin addressing the City Club of San Diego:

 

 

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One suggestion on how to pick of the pace…

Because I can...

Pursuant to the previous piece re: Paul Auster’s suggestions on how to shorten the games, I offer this reboot of the seventh-inning stretch “anthem”: Take me out Buy me some peanuts. I don’t care. Let us root root for the laundry; If they don’t win, meh. For it’s two strikes, you’re out. The end. (Time […]

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Oh, sure, blame the intellectuals.

"Oddballs"

When the baseball purists start calling for the heads of those who would buck tradition in finding ways to speed up the game, they might start with author Paul Auster. Auster came up with brilliant idea of two strikes and you’re out and three balls, take your base. The former is strictly two strikes, by […]

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Bookshelf reviews (sort of)

2015 title

Submitted for your interest, education, and entertainment, here’s a link to my annual baseball feature on Bookreporter.com. Titles include: Billy Martin: Baseball’s Flawed Genius Tommy Lasorda: My Way Joe Black: More Than a Dodger Yankee Doodles: Inside the Locker Room with Mickey, Yogi, Reggie, and Derek, Baseball Maverick: How Sandy Alderson Revolutionized Baseball and Revived […]

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Upcoming author events

2015 title

The Yogi Berra Museum in Little Falls, NJ, will host an appearance by Steve Kettmann, author of Baseball Maverick, tomorrow (April 18) at 2 p.m. Joining Kettmann will be Sandy Alderson, the subject of the book. The program begins at 2 p.m. Cost is $30 and includes admission to the museum for you and one […]

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A baseball book a day keeps (fill in the blank) away

2015 title

Sorry, couldn’t come up with an appropriate theme. Last week I linked to the first week in Tom Hoffarth’s annual 30-books-in-30-days feature. Catching up: Day 8: Bats, Balls, and Hollywood Stars: Hollywood’s Love Affair with Baseball, by Joe Siegman Day 9: A Game of Their Own: Voices of Contemporary Women in Baseball,by Jennifer Ring Day […]

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Baseball Best-Sellers, April 17, 2015

"Annuals"

NEW STUFF: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So… […]

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Throwback Thursday (aka, MASSIVE links dump, part two)

2010 title

Since I posted the first of these last Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric. As a reminder, I highly recommend Pocket as a way to hold onto links you come that you want to keep. Unlike bookmarks, Pocket […]

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Paying it forward

Because I can...

A few weeks ago, I published a Q&A with Matt Nadel, the 16-year-old blogger and author of Amazing Aaron to Zero Zippers. So I got this brilliant of idea of killing two birds with one stone: cleaning up and “investing” in the future of baseball scholarship. I’ve been trying to cull the herd of my […]

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