From the category archives:

2011 title

It’s a hard-knock life for many of the young men in the Dominican Republic aspiring to become major leaguers. Baseball fans have long known about the economic and social discrepancies between American-born athletes and their Latin American counterparts, especially when it comes to signing bonuses. Sometimes it’s even more nefarious. Look it’s a business, we […]

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Well, perhaps not crazy. Let’s just say “annoyed?” I was reading this piece about “Why I’m Giving Up the NYTimes Book Review Habit,” by Matthew Gasda on the IndieReader website when I came across this passage: This means that, for instance, when a completely unoriginal, flat book gets pushed by its publisher as the next […]

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Unusual in that one of the pieces appeared in the main section, not on the sports pages: Dan Barry, author of Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game, does a follow-up of sorts in this profile of Doc Edwards, one of those “baseball lifers.” Edwards, 76, was manager of the Rochester Red […]

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Bits and pieces

February 15, 2013 · 3 comments

The best way to play catch-up is via a “Bits and Pieces” entry so here goes: James Bailey offers this appreciation for W.P. Kinsella’s The Iowa Baseball Confederacy. Rob Neyer, Grant Brisbee, and Murray Chass on Mike Piazza and his new book, Long Shot. Don’t know where this excellent Simpsons/Moneyball mashup came from, but Brisbee […]

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Posted two more author interviews to the 501 Baseball Book site: Sean Manning, editor of Top of the Order: 25 Writers Pick Their Favorite Baseball Player of All Time and Peter Schilling Jr., author of The End of Baseball: A Novel. You can hear them by visiting the 501 author Q&A page. The list so […]

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The “Dark” Knight?

January 24, 2013 · 0 comments

Supposedly former sportswriter and baseball commissioner Ford Frick was the one to bestow on Stan Musial the honor, “baseball’s perfect knight.” But as we all know, nobody’s perfect. That’s why I wonder about the purpose of this piece by Luke Epplin in The Atlantic that seeks to drive home the point. In particular, Epplin (who […]

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Some recent news about Jewish authors and their baseball output. Lawrence Ruttman publishes American Jews and America’s Game:Voices of a Growing Legacy in Baseball, from University of Nebraska Press, this spring. UNP is the same outfit that’s releasing my (shameless plug) 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die. I met Ruttman, a New […]

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I’m a big fan of audio books. I recently borrowed two titles from the library — The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives, by Mlodinow, Leonard, and 1861: The Civil War Awakening, by Adam Goodheart — that would seem to have nothing to do with the national pastime. But lo and behold the former […]

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Craig Robinson is one of my favorite Internet friends. One of his websites offers unusual graphical representations of ideas (infographics), such as how tall Alex Rodriguez’s salary would be in penny form (short answer, miles). Robinson published Flip Flop Fly Ball: An Infographic Baseball Adventure, a collection of his work last year, which I highly […]

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Bits and pieces, Nov. 9

November 9, 2012 · 0 comments

♦  One of my neo-favorites books have been the Freaknomics series. Their blog included this item about the eternal question (well, eternal since 1903, with the occasional break), “Does the best team win the World Series?” By teh way, Freakonomics co-author Stephen J. Dubner contributed an essay about everybody’s favorite comeback kid,  Adam Greenberg, in […]

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Bits and pieces

November 7, 2012 · 0 comments

♦  I’m including this piece just because I find it amusing. I hope the Brits don’t get all their baseball info like this. ♦  Who says fiction about the national pastime has to be confined to literature? Here’s a case of fictitious baseball merchandise. ♦  Dan Epstein, author of Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A […]

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The Bergino Baseball Clubhouse (67 East 11 Street, NYC, 212-226-7150 keeps the hot stove going with another series of authors discussions. All programs begin at 7 p.m. Where applicable, I’ve included links to my reviews of the books or other pertinent information. Guests include:  Jim (“No Realtion”) Kaplan, author of The Greatest Game Ever Pitched: […]

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CBS’ Face the Nation took a break in its last episode to discuss some really important issues. Jane Leavy (formerly of the Washington Post and author of The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America’s Childhood and Sandy Koufax : A Lefty’s Legacy); Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda (I Live for This: […]

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(As opposed to the Dan Epstein who was the photographer for my daughter’s bat mitzva. But I digress) The author of Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s will appear at the Gallery Zeke, the Steelville Arts Council’s new fine arts gallery, which is set to […]

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I don’t know about you, but being the curmudgeon that I am, I have trouble with the folks who jump on the baseball bandwagon once the regular season is over. This ain’t the NBA or NHL, bud, where everyone gets into the playoffs so you don’t have to pay attention until there are just a […]

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Review roundup, Sept. 25

September 25, 2012 · 0 comments

♦  Baseball de World ran this review of Mike Shropshire’s Seasons in Hell. Upshot: “Overall, the story was a pleasure to read.” ♦  Here’s another review of the new Clint Eastwood project, Trouble with the Curve  (“Predictable”). And one from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (“a by-the-book romantic comedy that has the usual ingredients.”) ♦  A mini-review […]

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Enjoyed reading a few … well, what to call them? They’re not exactly graphic novels since they deal with real-life figures.. Anyway… The first was 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente, which is described as a graphic novel on the dust cover. Written/drawn by Wilfred Santiago and published by Fantographic Books last year, this is […]

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Review roundup, Aug. 22

August 22, 2012 · 0 comments

♦ From the Tulsa World, this on on Robert Fitts’ Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, and Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan. Upshot: “It is very well-researched and a balanced account, but it occasionally threatens to sag under the weight of such details. Readers need not be fans of baseball to appreciate the sport […]

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Review roundup, Aug. 17

August 17, 2012 · 0 comments

♦ The Summer 2012 issue of Jewish Currents features a review by Cynthia Werthamer of Pitching in the Promised Land: A Story of the First and Only Season in the Israel Baseball League, by former IBL hurler Aaron Pribble. Upshot: “While Pribble’s book could do with less foreshadowing…, his retelling of the ups and downs […]

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Before there was film, before there was even television, photography was the only means by which fans could see the players. The medium was still developing (pardon the pun), so the men (almost exclusively), who snapped their shutters were still learning about such things as angles, speed, placement, composition, etc. One of the early pioneers […]

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