Posts tagged as:

Jonah Keri

Been busy finalizing my forthcoming book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, which has severely reduced my Bookshelf time. (Even got my first blurb! Very cool.) So in attempt to play catch-up… It’s nice to have your book referenced in a story. You never know that it might […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The new normal in baseball literature is to publish something — anything — that pushes baseball analytics as the only logical way to assemble a team. Michael Lewis’ Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game may may have been the first “official” book to address the concept, but there have been several since its […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Speaking of the Expos…

March 26, 2015

That’s what Jonah Keri, author of Up, Up, and Away: The Kid, the Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, Youppi!, the Crazy Business of Baseball, and the Ill-fated but Unforgettable Montreal Expos, will be doing in a book tour that will see him in Montreal, Toronto, and Pembrooke, the last of which will take […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Baseball best-sellers, Sept. 12

September 12, 2014

Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Few things bring a smile to my face more than memories of Montreal. My maternal family hails from that city and I spent many happy times there, including five summers working at Camp Maromac in the Laurentian Mountains. So it’s only natural I would become a fan of the Montreal Expos. And disappointed when they […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

(And no, we’re not talking about Superman here.) Congratulations to Teddie A. of Lutherville, MD, winner of last week’s book, Stars and Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial Summer of ’76, by Dan Epstein. This week’s offering is Jonah Keri’s Up, Up, and Away: The Kid, the Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The top ten baseball books as per Amazon.com. Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); I’m old fashioned that way. Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read it. But it’ll be close enough for government work. Caveat […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bits and pieces, April 25

April 25, 2014

Politics aside, I’ve often wondering why such smart people such as Doris Kearns Goodwin, Thomas Oliphant, and George Will (among others), have such an affinity for baseball. here, Will — author of A Nice Little Place on the North Side: Wrigley Field at One Hundred — tries to explain why the game is such a […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The top-ten baseball books as per Amazon.com. Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); I’m old fashioned that way. Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read it. But it’ll be close enough for government work. Caveat 3: […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The top-ten baseball books as per Amazon.com. Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); I’m old fashioned that way. Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read it. But it’ll be close enough for government work. Caveat 3: […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The top-ten baseball books as per Amazon.com. Caveat 1: Print editions only (at least for now); I’m old fashioned that way. Caveat 2: Since the rankings are updated every hour, these lists might not longer be 100 percent accurate by the time you read it. But it’ll be close enough for government work. Caveat 3: […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bits and pieces, April 4

April 4, 2014

Been a hectic week, so I’ve let a few things slide. First and foremost, the next books in Tom Hoffarth’s annually excellent 30-in-30 series: John Feinstein’s Where Nobody Knows Your Name and Ed Sherman’s Babe Ruth’s Called Shot. Here’s another Feinstein item from WRALSPortsfan.com. And maybe you can find the link in this piece from […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Thursday, April 10 is baseball night at Varsity Letters at The Gallery at LPR. Grantland’s Jonah Keri,  will read from his new book Up, Up, and Away: The Kid, the Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, Youppi!, the Crazy Business of Baseball, and the Ill-fated but Unforgettable Montreal Expos. He’ll be joined by Kostya […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Nate Silver recently began his 538.com site under the aegis of ESPN. One would hope that he and his minions will produce a lot of smart sports (i.e., baseball) stuff. Obviously a site dedicated to projections and predictions has a lot of math to it. Ugh.But you have to take the “bad” with the good. […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Seems most of the buzz lately is about Kostya Kennedy’s Pete Rose: An American Dilemma, John Rosengrens’s Marichal-Roseboro book, The Fight of Their Lives, and Jonah Keri’s Up, Up, and Away, the new history about  the Montreal Expos. Rosengren From Mike Bauman/MLB.com: “Book tells of redemption for Marichal, Roseboro“ This one from Allen Barra will […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bienvenue, Mets

March 25, 2014

Because I have such an affinity for Montreal, the ancestral home of my mother’s side of the family, I enjoy anything that has to do with the Expos. I don’t care what anyone says, I loved Jarry Park, which, not unlike Ebbets Field was to some Brooklyn Dodger fans, was walking distance from my aunt’s […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bits and pieces, March 3

March 3, 2014

John Feinstein, author of Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life In the Minor Leagues of Baseball will be making the rounds on the various sports-talk radio and other shows. Here he is on Only a Game and on CBS’ Dallas-Ft. Worth affiliate. I know this will sound like sour grapes, but prolific guys like Feinstein (and […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Coming down the pike

October 24, 2013

It used to be that you had to wait until spring to enjoy books about the previous season. Now, thanks in part to real-time statistical studies and improved publishing capabilities, it’s just a matter of how fast fast the writer/outlet can get their material to the printer. Case in point: the The Bill James Handbook, […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Would if I could upon learning that Jonah (The Extra 2%: How Wall Street Strategies Took a Major League Baseball Team from Worst to First) Keri is working on the “definitive” history of the team. Although I was not born there, my maternal side hails from that city and I have fond memories of family […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();