Posts tagged as:

Bruce Weber

Forgive the nihilism, but such is the meaninglessness of life. I was about to line the bottom of the birdcage this morning and just happened to notice that one of the pages carried the obituary for “Tom Knight, 89; Knew It All About Brooklyn Baseball.” The 750-plus-word New York Times tribute was written by by […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

One of the last great nicknames, Walt “No Neck” Williams died Jan. 23 at the age of 72. Williams debuted with the Houston Astros in 1964. He returned after another couple of years in the minors, spending six of his 10 big league seasons with the Chicago White Sox. He also played for the Cleveland […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Lest we forget: Ken Johnson

November 24, 2015

I frequently think about the statement, “X is going to be the first line in the obituary.” It’s usually offered when someone has a good life but will remembered for some unusual (often unfortunate) incident. Think about Steve Bartman or Bill Buckner, they should live and be well for many years. It’s a bit different […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Siebern died Friday at the age of 82. Another one of the “old” players on the cusp of my introduction to baseball. You know how you’re such a terrible judge of age when you’re a kid? This card comes from the 1968 set, when Siebern was 32 and in the last season of his Major […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

A few weeks ago, I believe I was among the first in baseball circles to mention the passing of Jim Brosnan. In fact, I take at least some credit for his obit in The New York Times since Bruce Weber, who wrote the piece, had not heard of Brosnan’s death prior to my e-mail to […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Now that Derek Jeter’s behavior has been the subject of several ethical ramblings — including Bruce Weber, author of As They See ‘Em: A Fan’s Travels in the Land of Umpires — the gloves are off (and the caps are on). Without their beloved captain and role model towing the line, the rules of propriety […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Here’s a sneak preview of The New York Times Sunday Book Review: (Grateful for the opportunity to reproduce the cool graphic that ran with the piece.) Bruce Weber, author of As They See ‘Em: A Fan’s Travels in the Land of Umpires, gives his take on The Baseball Codes: Beanballs, Sign Stealing, and Bench-Clearing Brawls: […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Review: As They See 'Em

January 5, 2010

BleedCubbieBlue,  a — what else — Cubs blog, posted this review of Bruce Weber’s book. Upshot: “Bruce Weber, you wrote one heckuva book.”

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Including: ◊ Game Six: Cincinnati, Boston, and the 1975 World Series: The Triumph of America’s Pastime, by Mark Frost. Unabridged (13:56), narrated by Andrew Garman. Hear a sample: ◊ Sixty Feet, Six Inches: A Hall of Fame Pitcher and a Hall of Fame Hitter Talk about How the Game Is Played , by Bob Gibson, […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Review: As They See 'Em

August 7, 2009

from the aptly-named New-Books-Review.com, this collection of reviews on Bruce Weber’s gem.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Here come de judge?

July 13, 2009

Bruce Weber, author of As They See ‘Em: A Fan’s Travels in the Land of Umpires (one of my top three books of the year), published this piece in The New York Times’ Week in review section, comapring the roles of arbiters in the legal system and on the baseball diamond. “Have you read Roe v. […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Yesterday, Larry Tye, author of the new Satchel Paige biography, was a guest on The Leonard Lopate Show. Hear it here: * A recent episode of Radio Lab considered the likelihood of athletics streaks, including Joe DiMaggio’s 56-gamer. Superior ability or just random chance? You can here it here: * The June 23 program […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Review: As They See 'Em

April 30, 2009

The Hardball Times published this one. As usual, the reviews that come out of HBT are literate, in-depth, and well-conceived.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

This entry on Officiating.com refers George F. Will’s column on Bruce Weber’s new book, As They See ‘Em. Strictly speaking, it is not, as the title asserts, a paean for umpires, but rather dap for the book.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Review: As They See 'Em

April 21, 2009

From George Will, syndicated in the Seattle Times. Upshot: Forests are felled to produce baseball books, about 600 a year, most of them not worth the paper they should never have been printed on. Weber’s, however, is a terrific introduction to, among much else, the rule book’s Talmudic subtleties…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bruce Weber is making the rounds for his new book on umpires. This week, it’s Fresh Air. As an added bonus (like a box of cereal), the page comes with an excerpt from his book, As They See ‘Em, which was selected for NPR’s “Books We Like.” More recent baseball items from NPR: Secret Dirt’s […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Would baseball fans want a world in which all the calls on the field could be made by Questec-type devices or the Cyclops machines used in tennis? Are umpires part of the game or outside it? Are they, as one baseball personality suggested, pieces of human equipment, like bases: necessary but not thought about that […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

* Review: As They See 'Em

March 23, 2009

Another review of Bruce Weber’s book on umpires? This one is by Jim Bouton, and the author of the seminal Ball Four, who does his usual witty job. But as interesting as it is to get different takes, one wonders why the publication that employs Weber would publish more than one critique just over a […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Dodger Blue and umpires, that is. The Leonard Lopate Show on NPR today featured two baseball segments. In the first, Although Walter O’Malley has been dead for nearly 30 years his, the former Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers owner is still one of the most controversial persons ever associated with the sport. Michael D’Antonio’s exhaustive […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();