Posts tagged as:

Bill Veeck

The National Pastime Museum website offers a collection of essays on My Favorite Baseball Books. The list includes many of the best-known titles as assessed by writers, critics, and other baseball savants. Among them: Bang the Drum Slowly, by Joe Schuster, author of The Might Have Been: A Novel The Natural, by Ryan Swanson, author […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Since I posted the first of these on a Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric. These are kind of fun; it’s like a box of chocolates — you never know what you’re gonna get. (Actually, I never understood […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Since I posted the first of these on a Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric. These are kind of fun; it’s like a box of chocolates — you never know what you’re gonna get. (Actually, I never understood […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

And the winner is…

January 15, 2013

The Golden Globes doesn’t have a category for books, but if it did I bet Paul Dickson’s Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick would be in contention. As it is, Dickson’s bio was named winner of the 2nd annual SLA (Special Libraries Association) Baseball Caucus Readers’ Choice Award.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Spitball Magazine announced the finalists for the publications annual CASEY award for best baseball book of the year. The titles include: Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, and Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan, by Robert K. Fitts Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick, by  Paul Dickson Connie Mack: The Turbulent and Triumphant Years, 1915-1931, by […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Bits and pieces

October 2, 2012

♦  The Ft. Wayne News-Sentinel published this piece by Mark Souder, a former congressional representative, about his favorite White Sox books, including this year’s Paul Dickson contribution, Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick. ♦  Tony La Russa is making the rounds on his book tour. He was a recent guest on NPR’s The Leonard Lopate Show (which […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The Chicago Baseball Museum is hosting a symposium on “One Family, Two Teams: The Impact of the Veecks on Chicago Baseball.” The program begins at 5:30 p.m., Chicago time. The list of speakers includes: Paul Dickson, author of Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick Dr. Timuel Black, Chicago historian Ron Rapoport, former Chicago Sun-Times columnist Roland […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Review roundup, May 16

May 16, 2012

♦ Macleans, Canada’s version of Time magazine, ran this review of Harvey Araton’s Driving Mr. Yogi: Yogi Berra, Ron Guidry, and Baseball’s Greatest Gift. Upshot: Well, there isn’t any per se. “After years of steroid scandals and cold-hearted business decisions, Araton has given us an old-fashioned story about the redemptive power of baseball.” The writer […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Review roundup, May 15

May 15, 2012

♦ In its Sunday edition, the Boston Globe published this roundup of sports book reviews, including A People’s History of Baseball by Mitchell Nathanson and Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick by Paul Dickson. Thumbs up for both books. ♦ The Lemuria Bookstore Blog offers mini-reviews for three baseball novels: The Art of Fielding, The Might […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

“Kid” in this case being authors who have been the subject of recent profiles and Q&A pieces, including: ♦ A Daily Beast piece with Chad Harbach (The Art of Fielding) ♦ A Q&A with Hart Seely, author of The Juju Rules: Or, How to Win Ballgames from Your Couch: A Memoir of a Fan Obsessed […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Review roundup, May 8

May 8, 2012

♦ Bailey’s Baseball Book Reviews posted this one on Grisham’s Calico Joe. Upshot: “We’ve now had baseball tales from two of the literary world’s heavyweights in the past three years. Both have failed to live up to expectations.” [The other one is Stephen King’s novella, Blockade Billy.] ♦ Bailey also offers this on Just a […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

And the hits just keep coming. Recent author interviews on NPR programs include: This Q&A with Jim Bouton, was the guest for a segment on “‘Ball Four’: The Book That Changed Baseball,” from Northwest Public Radio (an NPR “double threat”). Hart Seely, author of The Juju Rules: Or, How to Win Ballgames from Your Couch: A […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

♦ Bill Jordan posted this review of Paul Dickson’s Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick, on Baseball Reflections. Upshot: “Anyone who considers themselves to be a fan of baseball history should pick this work up. Whether you were familiar with Veeck or not before reading the book, you stand to learn a lot about this interesting […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

These come from the New Books Network which features news on several different genres, including sports. These two, both by Bruce Berglund, feature interviews with Robert Fitts, author of Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, and Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan; Lee Congdon, author of Baseball and Memory: Winning, Losing, and Remembrances of Things […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Review roundup, April 23

April 23, 2012

♦ The Knoxville News published this review of native son R.A. Dickley’s Wherever I Wind Up. Upshot: “t is rare to find a baseball book by an insider that dishes no dirt. It is even rarer to find a professional athlete willing to acknowledge his own mistakes. In “Wherever I Wind Up,” R.A. Dickey reveals […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The Baseball Reliquary program on Bill Veeck and his contributions to the game opens today in Arcadia, Calif. Paul Dickson, whose new biography, Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick, will be at the event. His essay on Veeck has appeared in several publications over the past few days.  

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Review roundup, April 2

April 2, 2012

♦ Bill Jordan at Baseball Reflections on Tim Wendel’s Summer of 68. ♦ Tom Hoffarth kicked off his annual “30 book in 30 days” feature yesterday with Baseball Prospectus 2012. Today’s book is Trading Manny: How a Father & Son Learned to Love Baseball Again, by Jim Gullo. (Here’s another review from The Oregonian.) ♦ Sticking […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

As I continue to do research for my own project, I get a kick when I find some old material that confirms I’m on the right track with some of my selections. Hey, it’s nice to find validation rom time to time, right? So today’s blast from the past is this brief appearance by the […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

GhostofMoonlightGraham conducted this Q&A with the author of the well-done novel The End of Baseball reviewed on The Bookshelf in September. Leave Blank:Do Not Change:Your email: 

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

I don’t often read baseball fiction these days. I find them too hit-or-miss, pardon the metaphor. One problem is that authors often employ too much exposition, as if their readership knows nothing about the game. Those who do know a fair deal about how baseball is played or its history, might find this boring and […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();