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baseball fiction

Sorry, couldn’t come up with an appropriate theme. Last week I linked to the first week in Tom Hoffarth’s annual 30-books-in-30-days feature. Catching up: Day 8: Bats, Balls, and Hollywood Stars: Hollywood’s Love Affair with Baseball, by Joe Siegman Day 9: A Game of Their Own: Voices of Contemporary Women in Baseball,by Jennifer Ring Day […]

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Since I posted the first of these last Thursday, which is known on social media as a time of reflection, I thought to make it a regular thing under this rubric. As a reminder, I highly recommend Pocket as a way to hold onto links you come that you want to keep. Unlike bookmarks, Pocket […]

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I highly recommend Pocket as a way to hold onto links you come that you want to keep. Unlike bookmarks, Pocket keeps the entire page and makes it relative easy for you to find stuff you “pocketed.” I have keepers going back six years — more than 5,000 links — and I’ve decided it’s time […]

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Submitted for your interest from another semi-regular scan of new titles. It may seem unfair, but I do tend to judge e-books by their cover, especially when they are offered only in that format. It’s an indication of the time and effort the author/publisher puts into the project. Similarly, I’m basing my opinions strictly on […]

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  Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. So without further ado, here are the top ten baseball books […]

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Review roundup, Jan. 21

January 22, 2015 · 0 comments

I frequently wonder about the role of book critics: Must they be students of the topics of which they read and report? Fans? That’s certainly not the case in this piece by Mark Dent of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Dent writes – with my annotations in brackets – The “summer” baseball book could have its own […]

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  Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… As you may have notice in recent […]

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Update: A new title has been added to the mix and new prices are in effect. The changes have been reflected below. I don’t know about you, but I’m finding this year’s World Series match-up is less than a major rush. The folks at MLB and the rest of the media have their work cut […]

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don’t know where, don’t know when… Taking off tomorrow for a little vacation. Not sure of the accessibility/availability issues, so trying to squeeze in a few so my mailbox won’t be so full when I get back. There have been at least a couple of baseball mysteries with the title Strike Three, You’re Dead, one […]

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It took almost half the baseball season, but The New York Times finally published a couple of baseball reviews in its Sunday book section. And the honors go to: The Devil’s Snake Curve, by Josh Ostergaard A Nice Little Place on the North Side, by George F. Will Both titles get the full-page treatment, which […]

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Looking over the overlooked in baseball books stuff. In honor of Mothers’ Day, this piece by David Seideman in Forbes urges you to “Forgive Your Mom For Throwing Out Your Baseball Cards.” Is it my imagination or are Mookie Wilson and Bill Buckner turning into Ralph Branca and Bobby Thomson? MLB.com described Mookie’s new memoir […]

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I’m all for newspapers and that includes student newspapers. Here’s a review form the Royal Purple News, from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater about a “local” baseball novel, It Happened in Wisconsin, by Ken Moraff Hmm, haven’t even heard of this one — Just Out of Reach: The 1980s New York Yankees, by Greg Prato –  […]

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Nyet read yet

January 7, 2014 · 0 comments

I belong to a Baseball Books group on Facebook. Every now and then, a member will post an item heretofore unknown to me. That was the case today when this one came up: Published in 1964 by Paul Molloy, a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, A Pennant for the Kremlin seems to fit in perfectly […]

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Bits and pieces, Dec. 13

December 13, 2013 · 0 comments

Looking over recent overlooked items… The Voice of Russia (!) posted this interview with Craig R. Wright on his new book, Pages from Baseball’s Past. Because Russia invented baseball, don’t you know. Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff, author of A Princess of Passyunk, “a novel of magical realism (published by Book View Cafe) which combines baseball magic […]

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The exemplary author‘s World Series novel is available free for the Kindle for the rest of the day. Here’s a review of that (one coupled with Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe) from the July 25, 1982 edition of  The New York Times by Daniel Okrent.

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The list is in for finalists for the 2013 CASEY Award for “Best Baseball Book of the Year,” as designated by Spitball magazine. Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere, by Lucas Mann Color Blind: The Forgotten Team that Broke Baseball’s Color Line, by Tom Dunkel Going the Distance, by Michael Joyce Heart of […]

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As opposed to fantasy baseball… Bruce Markusen over at Hardball Times posted this examination of “The Mighty Casey,” a classic episode of The Twilight Zone that originally aired during the series’ first season in 1960. The episode featured Jack Warden as the manager of the Hoboken Zephyrs and Robert Sorrels as the ballplayer of the […]

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With so many books I haven’t gotten to, I find it almost wasteful to reread books I’ve enjoyed (who would revisit one they didn’t enjoy? That’s like saying “this is a picture of me when I was younger.” As the late comedian Mitch Hedberg once said, “Every picture of you is when you were younger.” […]

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