Posts tagged as:

baseball fiction

Nyet read yet

January 7, 2014 · 0 comments

I belong to a Baseball Books group on Facebook. Every now and then, a member will post an item heretofore unknown to me. That was the case today when this one came up: Published in 1964 by Paul Molloy, a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, A Pennant for the Kremlin seems to fit in perfectly […]

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Bits and pieces, Dec. 13

December 13, 2013 · 0 comments

Looking over recent overlooked items… The Voice of Russia (!) posted this interview with Craig R. Wright on his new book, Pages from Baseball’s Past. Because Russia invented baseball, don’t you know. Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff, author of A Princess of Passyunk, “a novel of magical realism (published by Book View Cafe) which combines baseball magic […]

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The exemplary author‘s World Series novel is available free for the Kindle for the rest of the day. Here’s a review of that (one coupled with Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe) from the July 25, 1982 edition of  The New York Times by Daniel Okrent.

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The list is in for finalists for the 2013 CASEY Award for “Best Baseball Book of the Year,” as designated by Spitball magazine. Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere, by Lucas Mann Color Blind: The Forgotten Team that Broke Baseball’s Color Line, by Tom Dunkel Going the Distance, by Michael Joyce Heart of […]

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As opposed to fantasy baseball… Bruce Markusen over at Hardball Times posted this examination of “The Mighty Casey,” a classic episode of The Twilight Zone that originally aired during the series’ first season in 1960. The episode featured Jack Warden as the manager of the Hoboken Zephyrs and Robert Sorrels as the ballplayer of the […]

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With so many books I haven’t gotten to, I find it almost wasteful to reread books I’ve enjoyed (who would revisit one they didn’t enjoy? That’s like saying “this is a picture of me when I was younger.” As the late comedian Mitch Hedberg once said, “Every picture of you is when you were younger.” […]

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In my regular search for items for the blog, I cam across a couple of review for baseball fiction that caught my eye (ouch) and made me stop. A bit of background first. A couple of weeks ago The New York Times ran a front-page review of Telegraph Avenue, Michael Chabon’s latest novel in the […]

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Recently finished reading my second baseball novel (!) in the last month; The Greatest Show on Dirt by James Bailey was the first. I’ll be doing reviews of both of them in the near future as my 501 schedule permits. I wanted to contact Joseph Schuster but could find no info either on Facebook nor his […]

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Gary Perilloux posted this essay on Full Spectrum Baseball in which he argues that Joseph M. Schuster’s The Might Have Been: A Novel “may just be the Greatest American Baseball Novel ever written. Period.” Discuss.  

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There was an awful lot of bizzaro “news” following the death of baseball legend Ted Williams in 2002. For those of you unfamiliar with the story, Williams’ son, Ted Jr., who, according to many accounts, was a no-account person with no discernible skills of his own who pushed his ailing dad hard in the memorabilia […]

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If you happen to be at the University of North Carolina tomorrow afternoon, the author of The Art of Fielding will be on hand to discuss “collegial life, baseball and literature.” The free program takes place at 3 p.m. on the second floor of the Morehead-Cain offices in the east wing of the Morehead Building.

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The author of everyone’s darling The Art of Fielding was interviewed on a recent segment on Talk of the Nation. You here it here:  

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As long-time readers of the Bookshelf know, I feel awkward when it comes to reviewing fiction. It’s so subjective. I like dogs and you’re a cat person or I like vanilla and you can’t stand it. I’m also of a mind that if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything (although that philosophy kind […]

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Extra literary: Rutner, born this date in 1919, appeared in an even dozen games for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1947. He even had one home run. But he was immortalized by Eliot “Eight Men Out” Asinof as the inspiration for the main character in his 1955 novel about the struggles of a veteran minor leaguer, […]

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Joseph Wallace, author of Diamond Ruby: A Novel, will discuss his work in a program of books and baseball on Sunday, March 20 at 3 p.m. at the Ossining Public Library, 53 Croton Ave, Ossining, NY (914-941-2416). Dan Fost, author of Giants Past and Present will unveil the new World Championship edition of his book […]

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Wallace will read from his 2010 title, Diamond Ruby: A Novel, at the WORD bookstore, 126 Franklin St., Brooklyn, NY, tomorrow (Feb. 24) at 7:30 p.m. Wallace, who has several non-fiction baseball books to his credit, will be joined by Randy Susan Meyers, author of The Murderer’s Daughters. For information, call 718-383-0096 or visit the […]

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The new RKBB podcast features an interview with author Joseph Wallace, author of Diamond Ruby: A Novel. This is Wallace’s first foray into fiction., but not baseball. His previous work includes World Series: An Opinionated Chronicle, World Series: An Opinionated Chronicle, and The Baseball Anthology: 125 Years of Stories, Poems, Articles, Photographs, Drawings, Interviews, Cartoons, […]

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When I play ball, most of my teammates call me Ronnie. When I was in college, they called me Kap, a take-off on my name coupled with the Kangolish-type of headgear I always wore (at camp in the Laurentian Mountains, they called me Casquette for the same reason). When I look for those literary birthday […]

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Baseball in Folklore and Fiction, by Tristram Potter Coffin Rvive Books, 2010 Originally published as The Old Ball Game in 1971, The Mudville Heritage considers the hugely different way in which baseball was portrayed in the early to mid half of the 20th century. Coffin, emeritus professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, takes […]

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Joseph E. Wallace is probably better known for his well-produced coffee table books — World Series: An Opinionated Chronicle, The Autobiography of Baseball: The Inside Story from the Stars Who Played the Game, and Baseball: 100 Classic Moments in the History of the Game, among others. But he recently published Diamond Ruby, a novel (very) […]

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