From the category archives:

Photography

Looking over the overlooked in baseball book news: Tidewater Tides manager Ron Johnson gets a nice profile based on his inclusion in John Feinstein’s Where Nobody Knows Your Name, by John Feinstein. Speaking of which, the Roanoke Times posted this review of the book. Speaking of reviews, Philly.com posted this one on Jackie and Campy, […]

{ 0 comments }

Brad Mangin, who published a collection of his Baseball Instagrams last year, has a new slideshow of some of his 2014 spring training work on the Sports Illustrated site. Here’s my conversation with Mangin, conducted last September, about his somewhat unorthodox approach.

{ 0 comments }

This it the time of year when the baseball media offer their considered opinions on their favorite prospects. Sometimes they’re spot on, other times, not so much. So I thought, why not apply this to the upcoming “rookie crop” of baseball books? That is, titles that are making their debuts in 2014 — no reprints/reissues […]

{ 0 comments }

I used to think it was unfair that a sports media giant like Sports Illustrated can make even more money by dipping into their archives and publishing the compilations or photos or writing. But you have to give them credit; they do come out with some mighty good products. The latest from the SI library […]

{ 0 comments }

Like “Light the menora at your Thanksgiving feast”-early. So it’s not too soon to think about gifts for that baseball book fan on your list. Might I suggest (in addition to 501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die, which is perfect for off-season reading-by-the-fireside), the new Sports Illustrated Baseball’s Greatest. As one has […]

{ 0 comments }

Bits and pieces, Sept. 17

September 17, 2013 · 0 comments

How different would the literary world be if Tom Wolfe had grown up to be a baseball player? So where’s his baseball novel? John Rosengren, author of Hank Greenberg: The Hero of Heroes, will put in an appearance at his alma mater — Saint John’s University — on Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m. to […]

{ 0 comments }

If you’ve been following baseball for the past couple of decades, you probably have seen Brad Mangin‘s work. His shots have been a staple of Major League Baseball and Sports Illustrated, as well as other websites and publications. As such a veteran, I thought it somewhat counterintuitive for him to publish Instant Baseball: The Baseball […]

{ 0 comments }

The literary magazine is carrying an interesting series — Bull City Summer — which follows the 2013 exploits of the Durham Bulls. Not sure, at a cursory glance, which is the chicken and which is the egg, since Bull City Summer is a stand-alone website: From the “about” page on bullcitysummer.org: 2013 is the 25th […]

{ 0 comments }

As per Mangin’s Facebook post of Aug. 20: DROP EVERYTHING! Hey South Bay Giants Fans! Brian Murphy and I will be at San Jose Municipal Stadium (former home of Giants #1 draft pick Adam Hyzdu, shot by me in 1992) signing copies of Never. Say. Die.: The San Francisco Giants – 2012 World Series Champions […]

{ 0 comments }

A programming note

August 20, 2013 · 0 comments

Working on podcasts of interviews with authors Eric R9lfe Greenberg (The Celebrant: A Novel); Brad Mangin (Instant Baseball: The Baseball Instagrams of Brad Mangin); and Thomas Djya (Play for a Kingdom), not necessarily in that order. I am also trying to wrap up editing on a mini-documentary I created on The Merchants of Cooperstown (coming […]

{ 0 comments }

Feast or famine. I can go for weeks without posting any new material but in the past week I’ve had the very good fortunate to speak with three extremely talented artists: Eric Rolfe Greenberg, author of The Celebrant, which is considered one of the best baseball novels by just about every outlet who decides these […]

{ 0 comments }

Burton Boxerman, co-author with his wife, Bonita, of the two-volume Jews and Baseball series published by McFarland a few years back, published this review of Larry Ruttman’s American Jews and America’s Game: Voices of a Growing Legacy in Baseball in Baseball in a recent edition of the St. Louis Jewish Light. As an ye shall […]

{ 2 comments }

At Home Plate posted this review of Tom Dunkel’s Color Blind:  The Forgotten Team That Broke Baseball’s Color Line. Upshot: “This book is the story of those men and it’s a great story.  One worthy of being read over and over by fans who truly love the game and understand what we all lost during […]

{ 0 comments }

And so am I. Jury duty and still trying to get my day job done is taking up my blogging time, much to my (and I hope, to a degree) your dismay. But I wanted to pay tribute to one of my favorite sports photographers, Ozzie Sweet, who passed away Wednesday at the age of […]

{ 0 comments }

Bits and pieces, Dec. 11

December 11, 2012 · 0 comments

This goes back aways, but David Roth wrote about R.A. Dickey, mold-breaker for the concept of the cliched athlete, in the July 9 issue of New Yorker. More recently, Will Leitch offers these thoughts about the Mets in a “reasons to love New York” retrospective. Bruce Markusen at The Hardball Times posted this piece about […]

{ 0 comments }

Arcadia Publishers, which produces paperbacks of photos of specific themes, is offering “bundles of books” for $30. Of particular interest to RKBB readers are  the New York Baseball Bargain Bundle and the U.S. Baseball Bargain Bundle. The former features New York Sluggers: The First 75 Years and “four other surprise books” which are, obviously, not […]

{ 0 comments }

Sports Illustrated recently came out with a list of their choices for the 100 greatest sports photos of all time. Baseball Nation’s Grant Brisbee was ambitious enough to cull the baseball shots which includes, as ranked: 99. Willie Mays, “The Catch” 94. Greg Olsen, “Ow, my head and neck!” 89. Juan Marichal, “Windup” 83. Yogi […]

{ 0 comments }

Review roundup, Oct. 12

October 12, 2012 · 0 comments

♦  The Washington Post published this piece on Tony La Russa’s memoir, One Last Strike: Fifty Years in Baseball, Ten and a Half Games Back, and One Final Championship Season. ♦  Better late than never: It seems the Seattle Post-Intelligencer finally got around to posting a review of Zack Hample’s 2007 publication, Watching Baseball Smarter: […]

{ 0 comments }

Before there was film, before there was even television, photography was the only means by which fans could see the players. The medium was still developing (pardon the pun), so the men (almost exclusively), who snapped their shutters were still learning about such things as angles, speed, placement, composition, etc. One of the early pioneers […]

{ 0 comments }

♦ Tom Hoffarth’s latest in his 30 days/30 books series: Dodgers from Coast to Coast: The Official Visual History of the Dodgers. ♦The Los Angeles Times also ran this “straight” review on the Dodgers’ book.  

{ 0 comments }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();