From the category archives:

Lest We Forget

If not for the late pitcher, we wouldn’t have any books about 61, Roger Maris, or asterisks. Stallard passed away Dec. 7 at the age of 80. Here’s the NY Times obituary from Richard Goldstein. After making his debut with the Boston Red Sox in 1960, Stallard — a 6’5 righty — also played for […]

{ 0 comments }

Back on schedule… By now most of you are familiar with my caveats, so I’ll just mention them briefly: The list includes only print editions of books; calendars (even though Amazon includes them on their lists), no audiobooks (as much as I enjoy them), and no kindle (because I’m old school). Second, since the rankings […]

{ 0 comments }

I recently posted about the passing of the venerable author/editor. At the time, I was still waiting for The New York Times to weigh in. That came on Nov. 9 in this obituary by Daniel E. Slotnik.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The last member of The Teammates: A Portrait of a Friendship — David Halberstam’s excellent project on  baseball and life published in 2011 — passed away yesterday at the age of 99. A Hall of Fame second baseman who batted .288 with  288 home runs, and 1,247 RBIs, Doerr played his entire career (1937-51) with […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Lest we forget: Ray Robinson

November 2, 2017

Ray Robinson was among the last of his generation of sportswriters and authors. I had the pleasure of speaking with him on several occasions in my capacity as sports editor for the NJ Jewish News. He passed away yesterday at the age of 96. Marty Appel, shown with Robinson (right) at the dedication of a […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Lest we forget: Bob Motley

September 16, 2017

Bob Motley, the last surviving Negro Leagues umpire, passed away Thursday at the age of 94. I had posted about Motley when he turned 91. He was the author of Ruling Over Monarchs, Giants, and Stars: True Tales of Breaking Barriers, Umpiring Baseball Legends, and Wild Adventures in the Negro Leagues, which he co-wrote with […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The baseball world lost two alumni recently with the passings of Don Baylor and Darren Daulton, both succumbing to the ravages of cancer. Baylor, a fierce and fearsome batter who hit 338 home runs and drove in 1,276 runs in a 19-year career (Angels, Orioles, Yankees, Red Sox, As, and Twins), died early this morning. He […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The only man to be a member of a World Series winner (Milwaukee Brewers, 1957) and NBA championship (Boston Celtics, 1958-61) died on Tuesday at the age of 86. Gene Conley, a three-time All-Star, compiled a record of 91-96 in 11 big league seasons. he played for the Braves in 1952 when they were still […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Now it’s getting serious. Now we’re getting the the men who were playing when I was growing up. Sad. Jim Bunning, a Hall of Fame pitcher who became a U.S. Senator, died yesterday at the age of 85. Here’s the New York Times‘ obituary by Richard Goldstein. Bunning pitched a perfect game against the New […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The New York Times ran rather substantial obituaries on two baseball figures a few days ago, both by Richard Goldstein, himself a baseball author. Sam Mele, a baseball life, died on May 1 at the age of 95. Pretty smart guy: he attended Yale and NYU. Here’s his page from BaseballReference.com. I remember him from […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The New York Times obituary says the late actor was best known for his role as a southern sheriff in a couple of James Bond movies. Not for me. For me, Clifton was best known for his role as the penurious Charles A. Comiskey, owner of the Chicago White Sox, in Eight Men Out (which […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The acerbic comedian died today at the age of 90. A hardcore fan, he was frequently seen at those celebrity games as chronicled in Joe Siegman’s book, Bats, Balls, and Hollywood Stars: Hollywood’s Love Affair with Baseball, released in 2014. Rickles enjoyed talking about the game. Here he speaks with David Letterman in 1998. And […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

A bouquet of book covers

March 24, 2017

About a year ago, I posted about the different covers for Bernard Malamud’s The Natural; they’re so pretty… Here’s something similar about the late Jimmy Breslin’s 1964 release, Can’t Anybody Here Play This Game?: The Improbable Saga of the New York Met’s First Year, beginning with the original hardcover edition. I can’t vouch for the […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

NOTE: I have been posting these things long enough now that a few have commented that the introductory section isn’t necessary anymore. But I’m leaving it in because, to paraphrase Joe DiMaggio when asked why he played so hard all the time, there may be people who’ve never read the best-seller entries before. So on […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Lest we forget: Peter Horvitz

December 30, 2016

The teacher and lecturer who published The Big Book of Jewish Baseball with his son Joachim, died in Raleigh, NC, last Saturday at the age of 71. This was one of those Jewish “reference books” I’m betting a lot of kids received as a bar mitzva or Hanukka present. Horvitz also wrote The Big Book […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Perhaps best known for her portrayal of the avaricious owner of the Cleveland Indians in Major League, Ms. Whitton died on Sunday at the age of 67. Here’s her obituary in the New York Times by Richard Sandomir, who has moved from from his previous  post as the sports media columnist to the “dead beat.” […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Yesterday marked the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s death. I’m guessing that has something to do with the addition of Lou Gehrig: Pride of the Yankees by the legendary Paul Gallico to the Amazon baseball best-selling list (as a Kindle book). Naturally more recent books on Gehrig have enjoyed the ability of temporal distance as […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Forgive the nihilism, but such is the meaninglessness of life. I was about to line the bottom of the birdcage this morning and just happened to notice that one of the pages carried the obituary for “Tom Knight, 89; Knew It All About Brooklyn Baseball.” The 750-plus-word New York Times tribute was written by by […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

One of the last great nicknames, Walt “No Neck” Williams died Jan. 23 at the age of 72. Williams debuted with the Houston Astros in 1964. He returned after another couple of years in the minors, spending six of his 10 big league seasons with the Chicago White Sox. He also played for the Cleveland […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

One of the great ambassadors of the game, Monte Irvin passed away last night at the age of 96. Irvin was member of that generation of African-American ballplayers who suffered greatly as they integrated the game. Jackie Robinson was the first and most famous, and sometimes men like Irvin and Larry Doby don’t get the […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();