From the category archives:

History

Red Sox get Lost

July 30, 2014 · 0 comments

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the debut of one of my favorite TV shows of all time: Lost. The iconic program earned extra credit for me by including baseball in its canon: And here: Happy anniversary, Lost!

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“They come and they go…. I’ll be around here longer than you or anybody else here. I’m here to protect this game. I do it by making or breaking the likes of you. And after today whether you’re a goat or a hero, you’re gonna make me a great story.” Max Mercy, in The Natural […]

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Among the other things I’ve neglected to post recently was the cornucopia of recent NPR programs featuring baseball, in one form or another. On All-Star Game Tuesday (July 15) Leonard Lopate interviewed Ken Griffey Sr., author of Big Red: Baseball, Fatherhood, and My Life in the Big Red Machine You can listen to that segment […]

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The author of this Huffington Post piece makes a compelling argument. Most latter-day fans of Kahn know him from his nostalgic look at The Boys of Summer, which — hard to believe — was published more than 40 years ago. But he was also a beat writer for those Brooklyn Dodgers, as well as a […]

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Even if they might not have a logo on them. In cases where new inductees have played for multiple teams, it’s become something of an issue as to which cap they want on their plaque. There have been rumors that some teams will pay for the privilege of having their logo on display in Cooperstown […]

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Not to mention redesign the score books. You hear a number of sports pundits clamoring about throwing out the records of those who have used performance enhancing drugs. But really, everyone knows how impractical that would be. What would become of the record books? Since baseball is a zero sum game, if you take away […]

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don’t know where, don’t know when… Taking off tomorrow for a little vacation. Not sure of the accessibility/availability issues, so trying to squeeze in a few so my mailbox won’t be so full when I get back. There have been at least a couple of baseball mysteries with the title Strike Three, You’re Dead, one […]

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As discussed last week, Jim Brosnan’s contribution to the world of sports memoir has gone under-noticed. Only a couple of obituaries have appeared — The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Washington Post among them. Nothing of consequence from ESPN, or even MLB.com. I reached out to a couple of literary gentlemen for their […]

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All right, so it’s not exactly weekly. So sue me. Congratulations to Patrick M. of Mexico City, winner of Francona: The Red Sox Years. Next up for grabs: Philadelphia’s Top 50 Baseball Players, by Rich Westcott. A reminder of the new rules: This is now a random pick. I didn’t think it was fair for […]

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Have to rearrange the schedule a bit between last holiday weekend and next weekend’s vacation to California. So… Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, […]

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Trying to clear out the old mail box before the holiday: MLB historian John Thorn posted this photo on Facebook of a joint 1969 publication, ostensibly by Pete Rose and Denny McLain: At the time, Rose and McLain were the best in the game. Dayn Perry, author of a couple of baseball books of his […]

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The former Major League pitcher and the first to adopt the behind-the-scenes memoir as an active player and set the path for future writers such as Jim Bouton, Dirk Hayhurst, and others, died on June 28 at the age of 84. Brosnan, who was 55-47 in nine seasons for the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, St. […]

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The former general manager Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets passed away yesterday at the age of 88. Cashen, who was hugely successful with both franchises, was scheduled to release a new memoir, Winning in Both Leagues: Reflections from Baseball’s Front Office, in September. Richard Goldstein wrote the obituary for The New York Times.

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It took almost half the baseball season, but The New York Times finally published a couple of baseball reviews in its Sunday book section. And the honors go to: The Devil’s Snake Curve, by Josh Ostergaard A Nice Little Place on the North Side, by George F. Will Both titles get the full-page treatment, which […]

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Jayson Stark, the long-time columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, is a senior writer for ESPN.com. In addition to his writing, he appears on radio and television, including SportsCenter, ESPNews, Baseball Tonight, and a weekly segment during baseball season with WHB 810 in Kansas City. He is another in a pool of veteran scribes who has […]

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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Like any tool, social media can be a force for good if used properly. Case in point, it’s allowed me to “meet” some really cool people, including Dan Epstein, whose book tour for Stars and Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial Summer of ’76 brought him to the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse last night. I […]

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On the horizon…

June 20, 2014 · 0 comments

Made one of my occasional visits to Amazon for the purpose of seeing what new and exciting baseball titles or coming in the next several months. Here’s a sampling of some, excluding, as usual –  although with one major exception — books for younger readers. In nor particular order… * Baseball Explained. Phillip Mahoney, McFarland, […]

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Note: Just like Chuck Lorre’s “vanity cards” at the end of The Big Bang Theory, you should read these list stories to their conclusion; the end is always changing, even though the theme is basically the same, finishing up with a self-promotional message. On with the show… Here are the top ten baseball books as […]

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