From the category archives:

Because I can…

But not for me…

December 2, 2016 · 0 comments

With apologies to George and Ira Gershwin… They’re writing books on stats but not for me New ways to look at stats but not for me… In this week’s look at the top 10 baseball titles on Amazon, we have Incredible Baseball Stats by Kevin Reavy and Ryan Spaeder. To be honest, I received an […]

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(Note: I published this piece on one of my other blogs, The Worried Journalist. Just call me Double-Duty Kaplan.) When I was a kid I once got in in trouble for spending twice my allowance because I bought the latest issues of Baseball Digest and The Sporting News on the way back from running errands. […]

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As you may know, I recently became a victim of the downturn in print publishing. My weekly newspaper was bought out by another publication and while it will continue as an independent entity, the majority of staff were let go because of redundant positions. It’s a vicious cycle: the paper fires the staff and the […]

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The 2013 Jackie Robinson biopic was on this morning and the more I watch it, the more problems I have with it. Please understand, I have nothing but the utmost respect for everything Robinson and the others pioneers went through (we often hear about Robinson and Larry Doby, the first African-American to play in the […]

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Up the Amazon!

November 2, 2016 · 0 comments

Friend of the Bookshelf James M. wrote to tell me a way to get around some of those pesky Amazon search annoyances. Thank you, sir. I tried your Amazon search for recently published “baseball” books and replicated your results with too many children’s and romance titles.  I could not find a negative filter on Amazon […]

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I am preparing one of those “coming down the pike” entries to let you faithful friends know what new and exciting baseball titles await you in the year ahead. Amazon is my on-line book merchant of choice because, big. But I have a couple of complaints: I think I’m pretty savvy when it comes to […]

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Crossover episode

July 19, 2016 · 0 comments

As a “reward” for having my submission on an episode of Deadwood accepted into the Extra Hot Great canon (you can go ahead and skip to about the 37-minute mark), I got to choose a topic for an “EHG mini.” Shouldn’t surprise anyone that I found a way to combine my two favorite pastimes — sports […]

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The Dykstra debacle

July 18, 2016 · 0 comments

As you might have noticed from my weekly posting about baseball best-sellers, I’m not overly happy that Lenny Dykstra’s new memoir, House of Nails, is doing well. It came in at No. 11 on the most recent New York Times best-seller list for non-fiction. This isn’t a case of schadenfreude. It’s that people are more […]

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Separated at birth?

June 28, 2016 · 0 comments

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Funny, just the other day I received a copy of Dingers: The 101 Most Memorable Home Runs in Baseball History. I suggest the authors immediately revise the book to include this… Those of you who have been reading this blog or the Baseball Bookshelf know I hate hyperbole. The use of word’s like “greatest” or […]

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Yesterday on Jeopardy: Then I sat down to do the Times‘ crossword: Crazy, man. One of my Facebook friends suggested there should be a version of Jeopardy devoted solely to the national pastime. Baseball in Jeopardy? You’re welcome.

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Jeopardy update

February 25, 2016 · 2 comments

I am a Jeopardy nut. I try to never miss an episode, much to the occasional annoyance of my family. Naturally, I’m always stoked when there’s a baseball question. At the risk of sounding judgmental, I rarely expect the brainy contestants to have sports trivia as part of their knowledge base. And when there’s an […]

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Moment’s over?

February 16, 2016 · 0 comments

There’s a scene in the excellent baseball film Bull Durham in which Nuke LaLoosh, the prodigy pitcher, played by Tim Robbins, exults as he comes into the dugout after a strong inning of work. As he does so, his catcher, veteran baseball lifer Crash Davis, played by Kevin Costner, chews him out for all the […]

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Make’s it official then. Abbot and Costello’s seminal “Who’s on First” routine was selected by Vulture as among the “The 100 Jokes That Shaped Modern Comedy.” The jokes are listed in chronological order, not by funniest. In fact the title of the piece makes no promise along those lines. From the Vulture commentary: No single […]

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The Baseball Hall of Fame will shortly announce who, if any, of the gents on the current ballot will be measured for a new plaque. Forget the animus towards the players — I have never witnessed the bad feelings that have been expressed recently between the writers. Most of the latest comes towards Murray Chass, […]

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I know most of you have more pressing things to do today, you procrastinators, you. But here’s something for when you take a break. ♦ Like the Bookshelf, DiamondHoggers has a podcast segment. This episode features Rob Miech, author of the 2012 release, The Last Natural: Bryce Harper’s Big Gamble in Sin City and the […]

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Sidebar update blues

December 15, 2015 · 0 comments

Got me them Sidebar Update Blues, Them Sidebar Update Blues. Just ain’t got time to pick and choose, replace the old things with stuff that’s new. Some of those links, they’re dead and gone. Sometimes I get tired of carrying on. One of these days I know I’ll come around, but for now… I got […]

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Earlier this year I posted an entry about the relative intelligence of baseball fans when it comes to proper use of grammar, based on a report by Grammarly.com. According to the piece, Mets fans were the worst, with an average of 13.9 mistakes per 100 words; those who called the Cleveland Indians their own were […]

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One of my new favorite TV shows is Manhattan, based (loosely, I assume) on the men and women who worked on the atomic bomb. The episode “Overlord” highlights the continuing problems caused by Robert Oppenheimer’s frequent absences from project business as he cavorts with his mistress. One of the main characters, Charlie Isaacs, himself a […]

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