From the category archives:

Baseball art

Wonder of wonders

October 31, 2014 · 0 comments

Not a hard-core comic book guy, so I don’t quite get why there are two new books about the breakthrough DC character — the 75th anniversary doesn’t come for another couple of years –  but in thumbing through Jill Leopre’s The Secret History of Wonder Woman, I discovered there was baseball content in the second […]

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You ask, we answer

October 29, 2014 · 0 comments

In yesterday’s post about “Baseball and books — What’s the connection?”, a reader asked about the painting I used as a graphic element. Here’s what I found out thanks to the good people at lds.org, the website for the Latter Day Saints. Their response to my on-line query: “Young Joseph Fielding Smith Studying the Book […]

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I don’t get to New York City much these days and when I do, it’s usually to attend an event at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. Wish I could get to this one, though. I did a story about Gerberg several years ago when one of his collections came out. Unfortunately, it’s not on the newspaper’s […]

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Last month, I heard a  fascinating episode of The Leonard Lopate Show about what we “see” when we read. The guest was Peter Mendelsund, whose primary occupation is that of a book cover designer. You can listen to the segment here: August was a busy month for Mendelsund. Not only did he publish the aforementioned […]

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Once in a while it’s good to remember that the Baseball Bookshelf is not just about books, but about movies, magazines, collectibles, and illustrations, all of which can also find a spot there on. So here’s baseball artist Graig Kreindler, whom I first “met” seven years ago when I did a profile on him for […]

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I don’t need an excuse to visit the Yogi Berra Museum. For one thing, it’s almost a Roberto Clemente throw from my house. For another, they always have great events with interesting guests. (The only problem is parking. Hey, Dave Kaplan, work on that, okay?) Last night the Museum hosted an opening reception for “The […]

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Truth be told, as I get older (and poorer), I find I no longer crave every baseball item that comes out, so I’ll probably tale a pass here. Nevertheless, this two-foot by three-foot poster from Pop Chart Lab featuring 121 hand-drawn uniforms, ranging from 1869 to the current season, looks spiffy. You can see a […]

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The latest list of goings-on at the Bergino. I don’t get there often, but I’m hoping to finally meet Dan Epstein in June. Wednesday, May 28 @ 7:00 PM The Fight of Their Lives with John Rosengren _________________________________________________________________________________________ Wednesday, June 4 @ 7:00 PM Wrigley Field, with Ira Berkow _________________________________________________________________________________________ Thursday, June 19 @ 7:00 […]

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As of the end of the 2013 season, Jewish athletes had accounted for about 170 of nearly 19,000 Major Leaguers. So you wouldn’t expect the new “Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American” exhibit at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia to have the breadth of material one would see in Cooperstown. Nevertheless, […]

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This it the time of year when the baseball media offer their considered opinions on their favorite prospects. Sometimes they’re spot on, other times, not so much. So I thought, why not apply this to the upcoming “rookie crop” of baseball books? That is, titles that are making their debuts in 2014 — no reprints/reissues […]

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Sure, we all know how rare the Honus Wagner and Mickey Mantle rookie cards are. And how valuable if they’re in pristine condition. How many times have we denied ourselves the pleasure of just handling the cardboard, worried about bending the corners or leaving finger prints? Back in the seventh grade, I did a project […]

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As the saying goes, I don’t know art, but I know what I like, and I like Mark Ulriksen‘s work. The California-based artist has a unique style which has earned him a number of covers for publications like The New Yorker. His approach is entertaining and humorous while being reverential at the same time. Ulriksen’s […]

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The beverage, not the drug. Honestly, get your mind out of the gutter. From Mark Aubrey, my “proofreader,” comes this item on eBay: “1967 Coke Cap RARE PASSOVER variation Willie Stargell Pittsburgh Pirates HOFer” Asking price: $75. When I was a kid growing up in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, there was a kosher […]

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2014 already?

November 26, 2013 · 0 comments

Not quite, but you might as well prepare by purchasing your “personalized” baseball calendar from artists Maggie Lawrence. From her Facebook post: My calenders will be for sale $20 pick 12 images and email me or message me with your selections payment can be through paypal or check http://www.flickr.com/photos/margielawrence/sets/ make sure to get your order […]

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‘The Shot’ at 62

October 3, 2013 · 0 comments

Ain’t it funny how time slips away? Baseball artist Graig Kreindler reminded his Facebook friends that today is the 62nd anniversary of Bobby Thomson’s ‘Shot heard ’round the world.” There have been several books — both fiction and non- — marking this historic event, including, in no particular order: The Echoing Green: The Untold Story […]

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Haven’t done one of these in awhile. * The Washington Times posted this one on Willard Mullin’s Golden Age of Baseball: Drawings 1934-1972, edited by Hal Bock and Michael Powers. * WTOP in Washington DC ran this story and audio interview on Fred Frommer’s You Gotta Have Heart: A History of Washington Baseball from 1859 […]

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Bits and pieces, Sept. 17

September 17, 2013 · 0 comments

How different would the literary world be if Tom Wolfe had grown up to be a baseball player? So where’s his baseball novel? John Rosengren, author of Hank Greenberg: The Hero of Heroes, will put in an appearance at his alma mater — Saint John’s University — on Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m. to […]

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If you’ve been following baseball for the past couple of decades, you probably have seen Brad Mangin‘s work. His shots have been a staple of Major League Baseball and Sports Illustrated, as well as other websites and publications. As such a veteran, I thought it somewhat counterintuitive for him to publish Instant Baseball: The Baseball […]

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More baseball “visuals”

September 10, 2013 · 0 comments

Baseball Nation posted this entry about “Ten baseball movie posters worth another look.” It may be a matter of semantics, but I have a problem with some of the selections, even though the blogger includes the caveat that [N]ot all baseball movies have baseball elements on their posters and not all movies with baseball elements […]

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Josh Levin of Slate’s Hang Up and Listen podcast posted this educational piece on “The Worst Baseball Card of All Time.” Spoiler alert: It’s Bob Hamlin in the 1996 Pinnacle Foil set (card no. 289). Levin’s essay makes some very good arguments and offers a mini-history lesson on the industry, full of links to examples […]

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