From the category archives:

Baseball and popular culture

A chance to look over the overlooked. * Not exactly “Throwback Thursday,” but this piece on the Peoria Journal Star website is an appreciation for The Bronx Zoo, published by relief pitcher Sparky Lyle (then with the NY Yankees) and Peter Golenbock. * And another one from PJS about Double Play, a memoir written by […]

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As in Extra Hot Great, one of my favorite podcasts. While listening to EHG on my way to work this morning, I learned that Sarah D. Bunting (Bunting!), one of the regular hosts, was absent because she was delivering a paper at baseball conference. I did a quick search and deduced it was this one: […]

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For some reason, it seems a lot longer than 25 years since Major League hits the screen. Must be the clothes. To be honest, this was never one of my favorites. I found the characters a bit too cartoonish, especially coming after the more realistic Bull Durham. Although the phrase “Juuuust a bit outside” — […]

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All of these came in this week from my “alma mater,” the University of Nebraska Press. So many books, so little time.    

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I originally posted this on my blog about Jews and sports since Youkilis is one of the handful of Jewish players, but there’s enough book/movie/collectibles that I can kill two birds with one stone, so…  * * * Thanks to Robert Whiting, I have been able to find a way to keep tabs on Kevin […]

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Editor’s Note: Not exclusively baseball, but pertinent enough to include here. The New Jersey Council for the Humanities, in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution Museum on Main Street Program and six host locations in New Jersey, welcomes the newest Smithsonian traveling exhibition, Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America, to the Garden State in 2014. What […]

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Hey, don’t blame me. I probably would have forgotten about these if it wasn’t a segment on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. Two excellent pieces on Alex Rodriguez in The New York Times over the past few days. One was this from William C. Rhoden, who asks the question, “When will baseball, which only belatedly […]

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There was a disproportionate amount of baseball on the latest episode of Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. In “Who’s Carl This Time?”, we heard from Alex Rodriguez: CARL KASELL: I think that Major League Baseball has done me a big favor because I’ve been playing for 20 years without a timeout. PETER SAGAL: That was […]

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(A Baseball Bookshelf encore with revisions.) Small wonder in that they had a lot to do with Jackie Robinson. Robinson’s teammate, Don Newcombe, recalled a meeting between the two iconic figures for a piece in Time Magazine in 2007: Do you know what Jackie’s impact was? Well, let Martin Luther King tell you. In 1968, […]

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Bits and pieces, Dec. 13

December 13, 2013 · 0 comments

Looking over recent overlooked items… The Voice of Russia (!) posted this interview with Craig R. Wright on his new book, Pages from Baseball’s Past. Because Russia invented baseball, don’t you know. Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff, author of A Princess of Passyunk, “a novel of magical realism (published by Book View Cafe) which combines baseball magic […]

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Bits and pieces, Nov. 27

November 27, 2013 · 4 comments

Another in an attempt to look over the over-looked news in baseball books. I’ve only just begun listening to the unabridged audio book of Bill Bryson’s newest, One Summer: America, 1927, but if Richard “Pete” Peterson says it’s “a good read for Cards, Cubs fans,” that’s good enough for me. Kevin Baker, who worked with […]

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Score!

September 3, 2013 · 0 comments

Been a rash of stories about scoring recently. The keeping thereof, rather than the plating of runs in a game (or pitching woo). Last week, there was this ESPN piece by Jim Caple, a slideshow of scorecards, and this entry from Eephus League based on the ESPN story,   (not to mention this fictitious rambling […]

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Back from vacation, lots to catch up on. Baseball Reflection’s posted this review of Tom Dunkel’s Color Blind: The Forgotten Team That Broke Baseball’s Color Line. And the rich get richer: Sports Illusrated‘s Extra Mustard blog posted this piece about “Five Baseball Books You Owe It to Yourself to Read This Summer” (plus a couple of […]

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The New York Times runs this review of Mike Piazza’s Long Shot. Given that the book was released almost two months ago and they’re just reviewing it now, I won’t give up the hopes that the Times will do something with 501. The review is more of a “what the book’s about” piece than whether […]

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Besides my own book, there are some titles I’m really looking forward to this season. Among them: Keepers of the Game: When the Baseball Beat was the Best Job on the Paper by Dennis D’Agostino The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball’s Golden Age by Robert Weintraub Mickey […]

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Don’t hate Nate Silver because he’s beautiful accurate. With his baseball background, it’s easy to compare his philosophies/theories to the iconoclastic Billy Beane in Michael Lewis’ Moneyball as Carl Bialik does in The Wall Street Journal. Even our neighbors to the north wrote about Silver.    

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Bits and pieces

November 7, 2012 · 0 comments

♦  I’m including this piece just because I find it amusing. I hope the Brits don’t get all their baseball info like this. ♦  Who says fiction about the national pastime has to be confined to literature? Here’s a case of fictitious baseball merchandise. ♦  Dan Epstein, author of Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A […]

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CBS’ Face the Nation took a break in its last episode to discuss some really important issues. Jane Leavy (formerly of the Washington Post and author of The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America’s Childhood and Sandy Koufax : A Lefty’s Legacy); Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda (I Live for This: […]

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♦ Tom Hoffarth’s latest two entries on his 30/30 feature: The Team That Forever Changed Baseball and America: The 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers, by The Society of American Baseball Research, edited by Lyle Spatz, Maurice Bouchard and Leonard Levin, and Conspiracy of Silence: Sportswriters and the Long Campaign to Desegregate Baseball, by Chris Lamb. Upshots: Dodgers […]

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♦ Bill Jordan at Baseball Reflections on Tim Wendel’s Summer of 68. ♦ Tom Hoffarth kicked off his annual “30 book in 30 days” feature yesterday with Baseball Prospectus 2012. Today’s book is Trading Manny: How a Father & Son Learned to Love Baseball Again, by Jim Gullo. (Here’s another review from The Oregonian.) ♦ Sticking […]

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