From the category archives:

19th century baseball

These are my favorite posts, taking a look at what new baseball books are on the horizon. A few notes: Traditional print rules the land here here. There may be a Kindle edition involved, but no Kindle-only titles are included herein. Second, Amazon does not want top make my life easier. I practically never include […]

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Just finished thumbing through A History of Baseball in 100 Objects, the latest baseball release by Josh Leventhal, author of several other well-produced baseball titles. The objects included herein represent the game since before its “formal” recognized inception in the mid 1800s (and please don’t write about the exact DOB of the game). But the […]

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Bits and Pieces, April 18

April 18, 2014

The Passover holidays have played havoc with my schedule, so there’s a lot to catch up on. First off, can you remember those Bicentennial Minutes that CBS used to broadcast in the months leading up to the big celebration? Well, Dan Epstein, author of the new Stars and Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial […]

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Erin go ball

March 17, 2014

(And I hope that doesn’t mean anything dirty or inappropriate in Gaelic.) In honor of St.Patrick’s Day, I offer two Irish-themed pieces I’ve done: A review on Bookreporter.com of Charley Rosen’s The Emerald Diamond: How the Irish Transformed America’s Greatest Pastime. “The Sporting Life,”An overview of the Irish in America’s national pastime, published in the February/March […]

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A fair share of the recent Cooperstown Baseball Symposium considered myriad aspects of Casey at the Bat, which celebrates its 125th anniversary this month. The esteemed sportswriter Frank Deford was the keynote speaker for the event. Deford contributed a speculative article, “Huge Commotion in Mudville” to the July 18, 1988 issue of Sports Illustrated. Shortly […]

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Songs and Images from the Early Years of America’s Favorite Pastime, by Jerry Silverman. Alfred Publishing Company, 2007. Fans of both old-tyme baseball and music will enjoy this one. Part-music book, part-collectible (for the reproduction of the sheet music covers), part-historical analysis, The Baseball Songbook is a collection of more than 40 tunes (mostly heretofore […]

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Celebrating a couple of 19th-century Hall of Famers today. Wee Willie Keeler was born this date in 1872. He was a prominent member of John McGraw’s first group of rowdies as described by Burt Solomon in Where They Ain’t: The Fabled Life and Untimely Death of the Original Baltimore Orioles, the Team That Gave Birth […]

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They don’t get much more literary than this, which comes from the Hall of Fame’s Time Wiles via Facebook: Happy birthday to one of the first baseball writers, Jane Austen. From Northanger Abbey: …it was not very wonderful that Catherine, who had by nature nothing heroic about her, should prefer cricket, baseball, riding on horseback, […]

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* Review: Fifty-nine in '84

February 8, 2010

Old Hoss Radbourn, the Brutal World of Early Baseball, and the Greatest Season a Pitcher Ever Had, by Edward Achorn (Harper Collins) This review comes from the Basil & Spice blog. The book tells of a time in the game when men were men, for better or worse (usually worse). Upshot: “The author’s love for […]

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