You searched for:

Bookshelf conversation

Two of my favorite pastimes are baseball and movies. So when a book comes along about a baseball movie, you know I’m all over that. So there was with great joy when I learned awhile back that Richard Sandomir, the former sports media columnist for The New York Times (now on the “dead beat” for […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

I had the enormous good fortune to catch Claire Smith, the newest recipient of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award at the recent Society for American Baseball Research convention. Smith was the first African-American female reporter to cover baseball for a newspaper as a staffer with the Hartford Courant in 1983. She later became a columnist […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

I don’t like Jason Turbow.  Like Jeff Katz and Dan Epstein, he makes me feel old. Used to be that baseball nostalgia was reserved for the Brooklyn Dodgers — “The Boys of Summer” — and the New York Yankees of Mantle, Maris, Ford, and Berra. But thanks to these guys, nostalgia now seems to be […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Dan Schlossberg has written thousands of articles and a number of books on the national pastime, including a couple of my personal favorites on which he collaborated as co-author, Al Clark‘s Called Out but Safe: A Baseball Umpire’s Journey and Designated Hebrew: The Ron Blomberg Story. Schlossberg’s latest is also one of his oldest. He […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Don’t get me wrong. I love all my guests. But once in a while I get to chat with someone outside the usual baseball literary mainstream. That was the case with Scott Simon, host of NPR’s Weekend Edition. Yes, Simon, a lifetime Cubs fan, had previously published two books on baseball among his oeuvre: Home […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

It seems only fitting that I should follow up last week’s chat with Paul Dickson, author of Leo Durocher: Baseball’s Prodigal Son, with Marty Appel, author of Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character. Both books tell the stories of men who enjoyed a lifetime connection with the national pastime. Appel, a former PR director for the NY […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

In recent days, I’ve notice that a number of new baseball titles have “updated” nostalgia. By that I mean the subjects of these books are more recent than they used to be. Case in point, Scott Turbow’s Dynastic, Bombastic, Fantastic: Reggie, Rollie, Catfish, and Charlie Finley’s Swingin’ A’s. When did the 1970s become the “new” […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

If I had the wherewithal, I think I’d be doing something like Jon Leonouakis‘ streaming TV show, The Sweet Spot: A Treasury of Baseball Stories. I mean, he interviews people, I interview people. But as the saying goes, “Show me, don’t tell me,” and as a veteran filmmaker, he’s the man behind several well-crafted baseball […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Thanks to social media and email, there are probably people you’ve known for years but have never actually met. For me, Mike Shannon is one of those people. I would venture to say I’ve been corresponding with Shannon for 20 or so years but I only recently had a chance to actually hear his voice for our […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

What’s wrong with the national pastime? Seems like everyone has an opinion, but some strike me as more informed than others. That’s the feeling I came away with after reading Lincoln Mitchell‘s new book, Will Big League Baseball Survive?: Globalization, the End of Television, Youth Sports, and the Future of Major League Baseball. I can […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The warm feelings about the Chicago Cubs’ first world championship since 1908 has also had an impact on the world of baseball literature. To be fair, the Cubs have always been right up there when it comes to books about a team, comparable to the Yankees, Dodgers, and Red Sox, but almost for the opposite […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

There have been dozens of guys like Jimmie Reese, Birdie Tebbets, and many others who are known as “baseball lifers.” They spend their entire professional career in the game perhaps starting out as a player before moving into scouting or coaching/managing, or the front office. I have found there are baseball lifers among authors as well. […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Once in awhile a book will come along purporting to be “the next big thing” in how people perceive, discuss, and/or enjoy the national pastime. These are usually written by someone in the broadcasting industry, which makes sense. After all, these people have seen hundreds of games a year; who better to offer insight with […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

You can read the introduction to Part One here. The sentiment remains the same. http://www.ronkaplansbaseballbookshelf.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Bookshelf-Michael-Leahy-Part-Two.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

If you’re lucky, once in a while on your literary travels, you will come across a book that will be unlike anything you’ve read before. This is especially true if you concentrate on a specific genre or theme like mystery novels, biographies about your favorite personality or, oh, I don’t know, let’s just say baseball […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Many of us play Strat-o-matic or some other fantasy version of the game. Robert Coover wrote the classic baseball fiction, The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop. Well, Coover has company in Jeff Polman, who recently released Twinbill: Further Immersions in Historical Baseball Fiction — his fourth book — which includes a speculative […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Tim Kurkjian was one of the first interviews I did for the Bookshelf in its current iteration. (I’m still surprised, after all these years all these years later, that someone on that level would bother with a relatively low level blog such as this, and that’s not humble bragging.) Over the years I’ve found Kurkjian […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Full disclosure: Howard Megdal and I go back a fair piece. I did a story on him when he published The Baseball Talmud: The Definitive Position-by-Position Ranking of Baseball’s Chosen Players and we’ve kept in touch over the years. In a sense, I consider him my “rabbi,” the consigliere type as opposed to  than something […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

You can pretty much count on a new book or two about the Yankees of Mets every year. But 2016 has a bonanza with titles covering not only the latter’s success in 2015, but the 30th anniversary of the World Championship 1986 squad. On of these comes from Erik Sherman, who worked with Mookie Wilson’s […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Busy, busy, busy. That’s the only way to describe George Castle. The Chicago-based author of some 13 baseball-themed books for adult as well as younger readers, Castle recently released one of the most fun books I’ve come across in awhile: Baseball’s Game Changers: Icons, Record Breakers, Scandals, Sensational Series, and More. But there’s another one […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-5496371-4']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();